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Thursday, June 14, 2012

Fifteen Defendants Facing Drug Conspiracy and Firearms Charges


PITTSBURGH—Fifteen people have been indicted in federal court in the Western District of Pennsylvania for their roles in a conspiracy to distribute heroin and controlled substances and sell them in Cambria, Indiana and Westmoreland counties, U.S. Attorney David J. Hickton announced today.

The two separate, but related, indictments were returned by a federal grand jury in Pittsburgh on June 12, 2012.

A nine-count indictment charging violations of federal narcotics and firearms laws named the following individuals as defendants:

Kenneth Irving Carter, 31, of Detroit, Michigan; Dewann Jamal Macon, 36, of Blairsville, Pennsylvania; Jelina Montez Cook, 20, of Johnstown, Pennsylvania; Clifford Bernard Camut, Jr., 19, of Blairsville, Pennsylvania; Brittany McCune, 22, of Blairsville, Pennsylvania; Chivon Buttrom, 31, of Detroit, Michigan; Megan Holton, 26, of Detroit, Michigan; Brian Davenport, 22, of New Florence, Pennsylvania; Kimberly Cassidy, 39, of Blairsville, Pennsylvania; Arley Earhart, 21, of Latrobe, Pennsylvania; Joan Janick, 46, of Blairsville, Pennsylvania; Stacey Simms, 28, of Blairsville, Pennsylvania; Heather Bush, 35, of Blairsville, Pennsylvania; Holly Thomas, 20, of Derry, Pennsylvania; and, Jeffery Cline, 20, of Blairsville, Pennsylvania.

According to the indictment presented to the court, from the spring of 2011 to May 15, 2012, Carter, Macon, Cook, Camut, McCune, Buttrom, Holton, Davenport, Cassidy, Earhart, Janick, Simms, Bush, and Thomas conspired to distribute and possess with intent to distribute one kilogram or more of heroin, and, in addition, for the same time period, Carter, Macon, Cook, Camut, Cline, Bush, and Janick conspired to distribute and possess with intent to distribute a quantity of oxymorphone, in the pill form known as Opanas.

In addition, on February 1, February 8, and February 14, 2012, Earhart distributed less than 100 grams of heroin on each of these occasions.

On May 6, 2012, Macon was found in possession of a Hi-Point, Model JCP, .40 caliber semi-automatic pistol. On June 3, 1994, Macon was convicted in Wayne County, Michigan, of delivery/manufacturing of a controlled substance, which is a crime punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding one year. Federal law prohibits persons who have been convicted of a crime punishable by imprisonment exceeding one year from possessing firearms. Also, from April 8, 2012 and continuing to May 15, 2012, Macon maintained a place of residence in Blairsville, Pennsylvania, for the purposes of distributing and using heroin and oxymorphone, in the pill form known as Opanas.

From March 23, 2012 to May 15, 2012, Cook maintained a place of residence in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, for the purposes of manufacturing and distributing heroin, and on May 15, 2012, he was found in possession of a NEF Co. Inc., Model 92, .22 caliber revolver, which had an obliterated or altered serial number and which had been shipped and transported in interstate or foreign commerce.

The law provides for a maximum total sentence for Carter, Camut, Janick, and Bush of life in prison, a fine of $5,000,000, or both; for Macon, and Cook, of life in prison, a fine of $5,750,000, or both; for McCune, Buttrom, Holton, Davenport, Cassidy, Simms, and Thomas, of life in prison, a fine of $4,000,000, or both; for Earhart, of life in prison, a fine of $7,000,000, or both; and for Cline, of 20 years in prison, a fine of $1,000,000, or both.

A one-count indictment charging a violation of federal firearms laws named David McGinnis, 19, of Bolivar, Pennsylvania, as the sole defendant.

According to the indictment presented to the court, on May 6, 2012, McGinnis, while an unlawful user of heroin, possessed a Hi-Point, Model JCP, .40 caliber semi-automatic pistol. Federal law prohibits possessing a firearm while unlawfully using a controlled substance or when addicted to a controlled substance.

The law provides for a maximum total sentence of 10 years in prison, a fine of $250,000, or both. Under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, the actual sentence imposed would be based upon the seriousness of the offense and the prior criminal history, if any, of the defendant.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Stephanie L. Haines is prosecuting this case on behalf of the government.

The Laurel Highlands Resident Agency of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Pennsylvania State Police and the Indiana Police Department conducted the investigation leading to the indictment in this case. Other agencies participating in this investigation include the Pennsylvania Attorney General’s Office; the Cambria County Drug Task Force; the Cambria County Sheriff’s Department; the Cambria County District Attorney’s Office; the Indiana County Drug Task Force; and the Indiana County District Attorney’s Office.

An indictment is an accusation. A defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

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