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Friday, January 19, 2018

Deputy U.S. Marshal, Army Veteran Killed in the Line of Duty in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania While Protecting Community



Washington – Deputy U.S. Marshal Christopher David Hill, 45, died in the line of duty at approximately 6:30 a.m. today while serving a warrant on a fugitive in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

Deputy Hill was an 11-year veteran of the U.S. Marshals Service (USMS) assigned to the Middle District of Pennsylvania. He was part of a Marshals Service task force executing a warrant for the arrest of Shayla Lynette Towles Pierce, who was wanted by the Harrisburg Bureau of Police for terroristic threat offenses.

The team located Pierce in a residence in the 1800 block of Mulberry Street. While executing the warrant, the team was fired upon by a male subject in the residence with Pierce. Deputy Hill and two local task force officers were struck by gunfire during the assault.

Deputy Hill was transported immediately to the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) Pinnacle Harrisburg hospital where he died. The other officers were treated for non-life threatening injuries.

The male subject who fired upon the officers died when officers returned fire; Pierce is in custody. The shooting investigation is being handled by the Harrisburg Bureau of Police and the FBI.

“We are all extremely saddened by the tragic death of our brother, Deputy U.S. Marshal Christopher Hill, this morning in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. He was a devoted public servant who dedicated his life to making his community and this nation safer. We will never forget his commitment and courage,” said David J. Anderson, Acting Deputy Director of the U.S. Marshals Service. “The nation lost a hero today.”

Deputy Hill joined the USMS in 2006 in Washington, D.C., and transferred to Harrisburg in 2009. He also served with the agency’s Special Operations Group. He was an Army veteran, having served from 1993-96. He is survived by his wife and two children.

Michael “The Situation” Sorrentino and His Brother, Marc Sorrentino, Plead Guilty to Tax Crimes



Reality television personality Michael “The Situation” Sorrentino and his brother, Marc Sorrentino, pleaded guilty today to violating federal tax laws, announced Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Richard E. Zuckerman of the Justice Department’s Tax Division, U.S. Attorney Craig Carpenito for the District of New Jersey and Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation (IRS CI) Special Agent in Charge Jonathan D. Larsen.

According to documents and information provided to the court, Michael Sorrentino, 36, pleaded guilty to one count of tax evasion and Marc Sorrentino, 38, pleaded guilty to one count of aiding in the preparation of a fraudulent tax return.

“Today’s pleas are a reminder to all individuals to comply with the tax laws, file honest and accurate returns and pay their fair share,” said Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Zuckerman. “The Tax Division is committed to continuing to work with the IRS to prosecute those who seek to cheat the system, while honest hardworking taxpayers play by the rules.”

“What the defendants admitted to today, quite simply, is tantamount to stealing money from their fellow taxpayers,” said U.S. Attorney Carpenito. “All of us are required by law to pay our fair share of taxes. Celebrity status does not provide a free pass from this obligation.”

 “As we approach this year’s filing season, today’s guilty pleas should serve as a stark reminder to those who would attempt to defraud our nation’s tax system,” stated Jonathan D. Larsen, Special Agent in Charge, IRS-Criminal Investigation, Newark Field Office.  “No matter what your stature is in our society, everyone is expected to play by the rules, and those who do not will be held accountable and brought to justice.”

Michael Sorrentino was a reality television personality who gained fame on “The Jersey Shore,” which first appeared on the MTV network.  According to documents and information provided to the court, he and his brother, Marc, created businesses, such as MPS Entertainment LLC and Situation Nation Inc., to take advantage of Michael’s celebrity status.

Michael Sorrentino admitted that in tax year 2011, he earned taxable income, including some that was paid in cash, and that he concealed a portion of his income to evade paying the full amount of taxes he owed.  He also made cash deposits into bank accounts in amounts less than $10,000, in an effort to ensure that these deposits would not come to the attention of the IRS.

Marc Sorrentino admitted that for tax year 2010, he earned taxable income and that he assisted his accountants in preparing his personal tax return by willfully providing them with false information and fraudulently underreporting his income.

U.S. District Judge Susan D. Wigenton scheduled sentencing for April 25.  Michael Sorrentino faces a statutory maximum sentence of five years in prison for tax evasion. Marc Sorrentino faces a statutory maximum sentence of three years in prison for aiding in the preparation of a fraudulent tax return. Both also face a period of supervised release, restitution and monetary penalties.  Gregg Mark, the accountant for the Sorrentino brothers, previously pleaded guilty in 2015 to conspiring to defraud the United States with respect to their tax liabilities. 

Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Zuckerman and U.S. Attorney Carpenito praised special agents of IRS CI, who conducted the investigation, and Trial Attorneys Yael T. Epstein and Jeffrey B. Bender of the Tax Division of the U.S. Department of Justice and Assistant U.S. Attorney Jonathan W. Romankow, who are prosecuting the case.

Former Department of Veterans Affairs Police Officer Indicted for Civil Rights Violation and Obstruction of Justice



A former police officer with the Veterans Affairs Medical Center Police Department in Indianapolis, Indiana, has been indicted on federal civil rights and obstruction charges, announced Acting Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division John Gore, United States Attorney for the Southern District of Indiana Josh J. Minkler, and Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Special Agent in Charge of the Indianapolis Division W. Jay Abbott.

The indictment charges that on April 18, 2017, Michael Kaim, 27, assaulted a patient whom he was in the process of arresting outside of the Richard L. Roudebush Veterans Affairs Medical Center.  As a result of the assault, the patient sustained bodily injury. The indictment also charges the defendant with obstructing justice by writing a false report about the arrest.

The civil rights charge carries a maximum penalty of 10 years, and the obstruction of justice charge carries a maximum penalty of up to 20 years.



This case was investigated by the FBI and is being prosecuted by Trial Attorney Anita T. Channapati of the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division with assistance from the United States Attorney’s Office in Indianapolis.

An indictment is a formal accusation of criminal conduct, not evidence of guilt. The defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.