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Wednesday, January 28, 2009

Law Enforcement Jobs

The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN), a bureau within the Treasury Department’s Office of Terrorism and Financial Intelligence, is the largest overt collector of financial intelligence in the United States. The mission of FinCEN is to safeguard the financial system from the abuses of financial crime, including terrorist financing, money laundering, and other illicit activity. We achieve this mission by administering the Bank Secrecy Act; supporting law enforcement, intelligence, and regulatory agencies through sharing and analysis of financial intelligence; building global cooperation with our counterpart financial intelligence units; and networking people, ideas, and information.

If you are you looking for a diverse opportunity where you can use your knowledge, skills, and expertise, an exciting career with FinCEN may be waiting for you. Please visit the links below to view the current job announcements. It is important to remember that when applying for a job at FinCEN, please be sure to follow all instructions contained in the job announcement to ensure that your application receives full consideration.

Law Enforcement Liaison Specialist, GS-1801-13 (FPL: GS-13);
opens: January 21, 2009 closes: February 22, 2009
(You must apply online via Career Connector)

Law Enforcement Liaison Specialist, GS-1801-13 (FPL: GS-13); [All Sources]
opens: January 21, 2009 closes: February 22, 2009

MORE INFORMATION
http://www.fincen.gov/careers/jobposting.html

Monday, January 26, 2009

Officer Survival Mindset: Becoming a 15th Century Samurai in a 21st Century World

On February 6, 2009, Conversations with Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature a discussion Senior Sergeant Marty Katz, Broward County Sheriff’s Office (ret.), about his program - Officer Survival Mindset: Becoming a 15th Century Samurai in a 21st Century World.

Program Date: February 6, 2009
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Officer Survival Mindset: Becoming a 15th Century Samurai in a 21st Century World
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/02/07/Officer-Survival-Mindset-Becoming-a-15th-Century-Samurai-in-a-21st-Century-World

About the Guest
Senior Sergeant
Martin Katz, Broward County Sheriff’s Office (ret.) has more than 30 years of multifaceted experience in the criminal justice system in New Jersey and South Florida. His assignments encompassed administrative functions, as well as commanding uniformed patrol and criminal investigations units. Senior Sergeant Martin Katz served more than 23 years with the Broward County Sheriff’s Office in Florida, with progressive advancement through the ranks, supervising Patrol Officers, Field Training Officers and Detectives. He has extensive experience with police training programs, both in-service and academy level, as Instructor and Administrator responsible for development of various courses and curriculum in all areas of police work and law enforcement.

In addition to his law enforcement career, Senior Sergeant
Martin Katz has been involved in Martial Arts since 1958. He has received his Seventh Degree Black Belt in Japanese Karate and trained in Japan on 2 occasions with the Tokyo Metropolitan Riot Police and various senior martial arts instructors. Based on his law enforcement career and his martial arts training and experiences he has developed a survival course entitled Officer Survival Mindset: Becoming a 15th Century Samurai in a 21st Century.

Additionally, Senior Sergeant
Marty Katz is the author of the semi-autobiographical look at the inside of police work: Past the Uniform.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in
Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/02/07/Officer-Survival-Mindset-Becoming-a-15th-Century-Samurai-in-a-21st-Century-World

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Sunday, January 25, 2009

Badge of Life

On February 13, 2009, Conversations with Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature a discussion Sergeant Andy O’Hara, California Highway Patrol (ret.), Executive Director of The Badge of Life.

Program Date: February 13, 2009
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: The Badge of Life
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/02/14/The-Badge-of-Life

About the Badge of Life

According to The Badge of Life, they “are a group of active and retired
police officers from the United States and Canada who are victims of trauma-related injuries from our law enforcement service. We have suffered the worst that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) brings—the hopelessness, the despair, the flashbacks, the attempts at suicide, the nightmares and insomnia, the panicky hypervigilence, anxiety and terror. Among us are victims of both critical incident and cumulative PTSD.

Our personal experiences are varied and representative of what occurs in police work—shootings, violent attacks, the loss of fellow officers, near-death experiences, helplessly watching the death of a child, and more. We were drawn together out of a determination to help others avoid our fate. With the help of experts in the field like
John Violanti, PhD (author of Police Suicide, Epidemic in Blue and Under the Blue Shadow), Dr. Janak Mehtani, an expert on PTSD and Catherine Leon, LCSW, who has worked extensively with PTSD and law enforcement, we began to set a path.

We found that many departments still lack adequate suicide prevention programs. We found many departments have excellent programs—but limit themselves to suicide awareness and prevention. Our program came after long discussion and research--and the realization that, in the search for complex answers, we were all missing the simple solutions! Thus came about the Badge of Life program--a common sense approach to law enforcement stress and trauma that stunned even us by its utter simplicity.

About the Guest
Sergeant Andy O'Hara,
California Highway Patrol (ret.) is a military veteran and the Executive Director of The Badge of Life. According to Sergeant O’Hara, he “spent his last day of law enforcement sitting on the bedroom floor with his gun, trying to decide whether to shoot himself in the mouth or side of the head. Hospitalized twice with the effects of his post traumatic stress, he has written on this topic and spoken to numerous groups about the importance of this new program. Through those presentations, he has realized how well received and effective the message truly is. He is a member of the California Peer Support Association, the International Police Association and works as a peer volunteer with the West Coast Post-Trauma Retreat.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in
Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/02/14/The-Badge-of-Life

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Friday, January 23, 2009

Assisting Victims of Labor Trafficking

On January 28, 2009, at 2 p.m. (eastern time), the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) will present a Web Forum discussion with Florrie Burke, M.Ed., M.A., L.M.F.T., and Katherine Kaufka, J.D., on best practices for assisting victims of labor trafficking. Ms. Burke is a cochair of the Freedom Network (USA), a national network of service providers, attorneys, and other advocates who work with trafficked and enslaved persons and provide regional trainings throughout the country, as well as a founding member and the coordinator of the Freedom Network Training Institute. As a consultant on modern day slavery, she provides training, consultation, and presentation services to individuals and organizations in the United States and abroad. Ms. Burke recently served as the Senior Director of International Programs at Safe Horizon in New York, where she oversaw the antitrafficking program and the Solace Program for Survivors of Torture and Refugee Trauma. Ms. Kaufka is the executive director of the International Organization for Adolescents, and previously managed the counter-trafficking project at the National Immigrant Justice Center. She provides training and technical assistance, both nationally and internationally, on human trafficking and establishing collaborations between nongovernmental organizations and law enforcement. Ms. Kaufka has worked with local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies to provide emergency and case management services to victims of human trafficking, and specializes in cases involving victims who are children or adolescents.

MORE INFORMATION
http://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ovcproviderforum/asp/participate.asp

Friday, January 16, 2009

Learn More about Addressing Technology and Stalking

On January 21, 2009, at 2 p.m. (Eastern Time), the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), in coordination with the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), will present a Web Forum discussion with Michelle Garcia and Cindy Southworth on best practices for recognizing new technologies and addressing their affects on stalking. Ms. Garcia is Director of the Stalking Resource Center at the National Center for Victims of Crime. She previously served as President of the Illinois Coalition Against Sexual Assault and President of the National Coalition Against Sexual Assault. She has more than 15 years of experience working with victims of sexual assault and domestic violence and advocating for victims' rights on the local, state, and national levels. Ms. Southworth is the Founder and Director of Safety Net: The National Safe & Strategic Technology Project, where she works with private industry, state and federal agencies, and international groups to improve safety and privacy for victims in this digital age. Her efforts to end violence against women have spanned 18 years, with the past 10 focusing on how technology can be used to increase victim safety and how to hold stalkers accountable for their misuse of technology.

Visit the OVC Web Forum now to submit questions for Ms. Garcia and Ms. Southworth and return on January 21 at 2 p.m. (eastern time) for the live discussion. Learn how to participate beforehand so you are ready for the discussion.

MORE INFORMATION
http://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ovcproviderforum/asp/participate.asp

Sunday, January 11, 2009

True Crime

On January 30, 2009, Conversations with American Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature a discussion with Tom Basinski, Chula Vista Police Department (ret.) and known renowned true crime novelist.

Program Date: January 30, 2009
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic:
True Crime
Listen Live: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/01/31/True-Crime

About the Guest
After studying to be a Catholic priest for five years while earning a B.A. in English Literature from St. Mary’s University in San Antonio, Texas,
Tom Basinski traded his Roman collar for a badge and gun, patrolling the mean streets of hometown Flint, Michigan. After a year and a half in Flint, Tom Basinski moved to California where he worked for the Chula Vista Police Department (17 years), and as an investigator for the San Diego District Attorney (17 years). While a homicide detective for Chula Vista, Tom Basinski began writing true crime stories for various pulp magazines, eventually selling over 125 true crime stories. Tom Basinski is the author of the books No Good Deed and Cross-County Evil.

According to the book description of No Good Deed, it “is a true story of jealousy, rage, steroids, voodoo, strippers, and murder. The charred remains of 38-year old nice guy David Stevens are found in his incinerated Chrysler convertible December 23, 1998 in upscale La Jolla, California, with two bullet holes in his head.

According to the book description of Cross-County Evil, it is the “
true crime shocker of an 18- year manhunt for a killer rapist on the run. The murder of a San Diego woman in 1988 was eventually solved—nearly two decades later, and thousands of miles away after a Florida traffic cop pulled a man over during a routine stop. What transpired was an incredible combination of chance and relentless investigative work.”

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in
Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, Criminal Justice technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/01/31/True-Crime

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Saturday, January 10, 2009

Military and Police Books of the Year

January 9, 2009, (San Dimas, CA) American Heroes Press, the publishers of www.military-writers.com and www.police-writers.com, announced the results of their annual recognition.

About the Websites
Military-Writers.com is a website that lists servicemembers from all branches of the United States Armed Forces who have authored books. Currently, the site lists nearly 800 servicemembers and their more than 2,400 books. Servicemembers are listed by name, branch, rank and type of book.

Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local law enforcement officials who have written books. Currently, the website lists more than 1,000 state or local police officers and their more than 2,200 books. Law enforcement officials are listed by name, department and type of book. Additionally, the website has separate sections which list federal law enforcement officials, international police officers and civilian police personnel.

About the Awards
The Military-Writers.com Book of Year 2009 focuses solely on the written contribution made by the servicemember. It is that book found by the panel of judges to be the most significant literary contribution made by a servicemember in the previous year.

The Police-Writers.com Book of the Year 2009 focuses solely on the written contribution made by the police officer. It is that book found by the panel of judges to be the most significant literary contribution made by a police officer in the previous year.

The Military-Writers.com 2009 Book of the Year
Gunnery Sergeant
Nick Popaditch, United States Marine Corps (ret.) was awarded the Military-Writers.com 2009 Book of the Year for his book, Once a Marine.

On April 7, 2004, during the First Battle of Fallujah, Gunnery Sergeant
Nick Popaditch “was wounded in action. During a firefight with enemy insurgents, he was struck in the head by an enemy Rocket Propelled Grenade, fired from a rooftop into the commander’s hatch of his tank. He received numerous shrapnel wounds.” His injuries necessitated the removal of his right eye; and, “his remaining eye was legally blind. His right ear and nose sustained significant damage and an implant was placed in his skull.”

In his book, Once a Marine: An Iraq War Tank Commander’s Inspirational Memoir of Combat, Courage, and Recovery,
Nick Popaditch describes how at first he “fights to get back to where he was in Iraq - in the cupola of an M1A1 main battle tank, leading Marines in combat at the point of the spear. As the seriousness and permanence of his disabilities become more evident, Nick Popaditch fights to remain in the Corps in any capacity, to help the brothers in arms he so aches to rejoin. Facing the inevitable following a medical retirement, he battles for rightful recognition and compensation for his permanent disabilities. Throughout his harrowing ordeal, Nick Popaditch fights to maintain his honor and loyalty, waging all these battles the same way - the Marine way.”

The Police-Writers.com Book of the Year 2009
Jack R. Lundquist, Jr., Oakland Police Department (ret.) was awarded The Police-Writers.com Book of the Year 2009 for his book BeatCop.

Jack R. Lundquist, Jr. was born and raised in the City of San Pablo, California, a suburb within the San Francisco Bay Area. His desire to be a police officer was formulated early in life. He became a police explorer scout, and later a reserve police officer with the City of San Pablo Police Department. At age twenty-one Jack Lundquist was drafted by the United States Army, and served as a Military Policeman at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland.

Upon being honorably discharged,
Jack Lundquist returned to the San Francisco Bay area. After a brief stint as a Reserve Police Officer he was hired by the Oakland Police Department. During his tenure he attended the University of San Francisco, obtaining a Bachelor of Arts Degree. His love for basic patrol work kept him in a marked police car for two separate periods, totaling twelve years. The remainder of the time was spent as criminal investigator, ending with a seven-year period in Vice.

According to the book description, BeatCop is “a book filled with stories from the career of a BeatCop working the perilous streets of a dodgy city. The author is a retired Oakland Police Officer, who patrolled the streets for twelve years. His stories cover the good, the bad, and the oh-shits, as well as the humor experienced by a BeatCop working a large city police department.”

American Heroes Press Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Monday, January 05, 2009

Citizen Survival of Terrorist Attacks

On January 9, 2009, Conversations with Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature a discussion with self-defense expert Jim Wagner on how a citizen non-combatant can best survive a terrorist attack.

Program Date: January 9, 2009
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Citizen Survival of Terrorist Attacks
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/01/10/Citizen-Survival-of-Terrorist-Attacks

About the Guests
At the age of 14,
Jim Wagner began to his life long pursuit of self-defense by beginning his study of the marital arts. Four years later he joined the United States Army. In 1991 Jim Wagner, sponsored by the Costa Mesa Police Department, entered the police academy (Orange County Sheriff’s Department Training Academy Class 104). Like his Military training before, Jim Wagner was deeply influenced by the police academy’s realistic conflict scenarios.

During his career with the
Costa Mesa Police Department, Jim Wagner earned a place on the SWAT team. It was through this conduit that Jim learned about logistics, command post operations, hostage negotiations, entry team tactics, and sniping. On the job training included courses with LAPD SWAT, the U.S. Army Special Forces, the Orange County Sheriff’s Department Tactical Training Center, and from U.S. Marines Division Schools Camp Pendleton (Advanced Sniper Course, Military Operations Urban Terrain, Helicopter Rope Suspension Training, and Range Safety Officer).

While conducting a myriad of courses at Camp Pendleton, both
Military units and other law enforcement agencies using the base for their own training discovered Jim Wagner’s unique approach to training and his seamless blending of defensive tactics with edged weapons and firearms skills. Before long he was getting offers from the United States Marine Corps, U.S. Marshals Special Operations Group, Department of Defense police, California Highway Patrol, California Department of Corrections, San Diego Sheriff’s Department, Los Angeles Probation Department, U.S. Border Patrol, Immigration & Naturalization Service, U.S. Navy and U.S. Marines Provost Marshal Office, Drug Enforcement Administration. By 1996 Jim found himself being invited by foreign unit to train in their own countries: GermanGSG9, Brazilian G.A.T.E., Argentinean G.O.E., Royal Canadian Mounted Police, London Metropolitan Police, Helsinki Police Department, and various units in Spain, Mexico, and Israel.

The demand on
Jim Wagner’s time was overwhelming and in 1999 he decided to resign from the Costa Mesa Police Department and started teaching full time. Not wanting to fully give up his law enforcement career Jim applied as a Reserve Deputy at the Orange County Sheriff’s Department. Jim Wagner is the author of Reality Based Personal Protection.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles
police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, Criminal Justice technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/01/10/Citizen-Survival-of-Terrorist-Attacks

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530