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Friday, November 14, 2008

Maritime Security

The December 5, 2008, episode of Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole will feature a discussion on Maritime Security with author Michael Walling.

Program Date: December 5, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Maritime Security
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/12/06/Maritime-Security

About the Guest
After graduating from Montclair State College with a BA in Biology,
Michael Walling served in the U.S. Coast Guard for six years as a commissioned officer and a senior petty officer. His assignments included buoy tending, search and rescue missions, drug law enforcement, and oceanographic operations in the Arctic. As part of the Boarding Party and Prize Crew teams on two cutters, Michael Walling participated in the seizures of a Panamanian drug-runner and a Cuban fishing boat. His decorations include the U.S. Coast Guard Achievement Medal (O) for counter-drug operations, the Arctic Service Medal, the Sea Service Medal, the National Defense Medal, and the USCG Cutterman's insignia.

Michael Walling is the author of Bloodstained Sea: The U.S. Coast Guard in the Battle of the Atlantic 1941-1944; an editor of the Sinbad of the Coast Guard; and, the author of Choke Points. According to the book description of Choke Points, “Stretching from the treacherous shores of Iraq to inner circles of power in Washington, DC, Choke Points leads the reader deep into the heart of the War on Terror and the real threats of attack on the U.S. This is the first book of the Fletcher Saga that stretches from the tumultuous Colonial times to the ever-dangerous present.”

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the
Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, criminal justice technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/12/06/Maritime-Security

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Public Safety Technology in the News

Colorado to Deploy COPLINK in a Statewide Law Enforcement and Public Safety Information Sharing Initiative
PR Newswire, (10/23/2008)

Colorado is the latest state to deploy COPLINK® for information sharing. COPLINK allows information sharing and collaboration among local, state and national public safety agencies. Colorado agencies will be able to analyze information from databases from across the state. The system can help quickly identify
criminal suspects and patterns to deter crime and thwart terrorism. With the addition of agencies in Colorado, COPLINK supports 1,600 jurisdictions in 20 states.
www.marketwatch.com/news/story/colorado-deploy-coplinkr-statewide-law/story.aspx?guid=%7BDF2D11EB-E653-4272-8884-7E1CD0791D4D%7D&dist=hppr

Progress is Minimal in Clearing DNA Cases
New York Times, (10/24/2008), Solomon Moore

Clearing the nationwide backlog of cases awaiting DNA analysis is progressing slowly in some areas. According to status reports filed by more than 100 agencies with the National Institute of Justice, progress varies among state and local
law enforcement agencies who received federal money to reduce DNA backlogs beginning in 2004. About one-fourth of the 105 agencies received less money this year because they failed to meet spending goals. The problem is especially acute in Los Angeles, where the police department has an estimated backlog of 7,000 cases. In October, federal legislation was enacted that includes an additional $1.6 billion over six years to speed DNA analysis through hiring temporary crime lab workers, overtime pay and lab renovation.
www.nytimes.com/2008/10/25/us/25dna.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Cities See Decrease in Crime With ShotSpotter
Norwalk Citizen-News, (10/24/2008), David Hennessey

One city
police department in the Northeast that is using ShotSpotter is seeing a marked reduction in gunfire. ShotSpotter Gunshot Location System technology can pinpoint the location of a weapon discharge or explosion down to the foot. The technology triangulates the location of a sound and transmits data about the incident to computers. police in Rochester, N.Y., said the city has seen a 43 percent reduction in gunfire since they began using the technology in July 2006.
www.norwalkcitizen-news.com/topstories/ci_10805511

Reverse 911 System Used in Search for 77-Year-Old Woman
Brenham Banner-Press, (10/23/2008), Angela Hahn

Authorities recently used Reverse 911 to help search for an elderly Texas woman who had wandered away from home. Reverse 911 allows emergency services to quickly contact citizens with information. The family had been searching for the woman for a couple of hours before notifying
police. After searching without success during the night, authorities activated the city of Brenham's Reverse 911 system. Residents who received the reverse 911 calls notified the communications department if they had seen the woman. She was later found unharmed.
www.brenhambanner.com/articles/2008/10/23/news/news02.txt

Retailers Use E-Mail Alert System to Thwart Theft Rings
Patriot Ledger, (10/25/2008), Steve Adams

New England retailers are fighting back against shoplifting by using an e-mail system to alert each other and
law enforcement to sophisticated theft rings. Organized retail crime is costing merchants $30 billion a year. The Retailers Association of Massachusetts and retailers' groups from five other states have formed the law enforcement Retailer Alliance of New England. In the theft rings, shoplifters work in teams; some thieves act as lookouts while others pilfer merchandise. Retail groups want tough new laws to address the problem. Currently retail theft is not a felony under federal law unless the merchandise exceeds a value of $5,000 and are transported across state lines.
www.patriotledger.com/business/x1904370820/Retailers-use-e-mail-alert-system-to-thwart-theft-rings

Washington Seeks Tools to Fight Identify Thieves
Insurance Journal, (10/24/2008)

Washington state officials are seeking innovative ways to deter identity theft. At a meeting in October, 90
law enforcement officials, victims' advocates and representatives from the financial and retail industries discussed actions taken to date and ways to improve on those efforts. Suggestions made during the meeting include applying facial recognition software to all Washington driver's license photos and business licenses, appointing a special prosecutor to handle organized retail identify theft cases, developing a shared database for identify theft cases, and developing a new identity theft educational campaign targeting seniors, youth and businesses.
www.insurancejournal.com/news/west/2008/10/24/94977.htm

Prison Officials Looking at Cell Phone Tracking
technology
American Statesman, (10/30/2008), Mike Ward

The Texas Department of
criminal Justice is reviewing technology to detect cell phones in prisons after inmates used cell phones to make thousands of calls. During a recent contraband sweep of the state's 112 state prisons, officials found 71 cell phones, including five from death row, and 65 chargers. A variety of detection systems are on the market. John Moriarty, the prison system's independent inspector general, said some systems use hard-wired antennas that intercept cell signals; others use portable equipment to locate the origin of the signal.
www.statesman.com/news/content/news/stories/local/10/30/1030cellhones.html

New Communications Tools Help Emergency Responders
CNN, (10/29/2008), Marsha Walton

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and
technology (NIST) are working to improve emergency communications during disasters. Search-and-rescue robots used to help find survivors in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks in New York on Sept. 11, 2001 could not go far into the debris because radio signals were lost. NIST researchers have deployed a robot in an old silica mine tunnel in northern California to test how far the robot could go before the communications signal failed. The tunnel research discovered a "sweet spot," which is a frequency in mines, subways and tunnels where radio signals travel farthest. The information could help researchers design wireless systems that are more likely to function in a disaster.
edition.cnn.com/2008/TECH/science/10/29/disaster.communication/

Atlantic Beach Crime Information Will Be Online
The Leader, (10/25/2008), Jennifer Knoechel

Citizens in Atlantic Beach, Fla., will be able to keep track of crime in their community online. Using Crimereports.com, a map of Atlantic Beach will provide the type of crime and the block where it occurred. Photos of registered sex offenders living in the community will also be available. The city had considered developing its own system but found a vendor that could deliver the service for less money. The city's cost for the services is $99 per month.
www.beachesleader.com/articles/2008/10/24/beaches_leader/news/doc4901cf516134d906105116.txt

Monday, November 10, 2008

A Conversation with Stacy Dittrich

On November 14, 2008, Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole will feature a conversation with Stacy Dittrich, an award-winning 15-year law enforcement officer, author, media consultant, and former detective specializing in sex crimes

Program Date: November 14, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: A Conversation with Stacy Dittrich
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/11/15/A-Conversation-with-Stacy-Dittrich

About the Guest
Stacy Dittrich is an award-winning 15-year law enforcement officer, author, media consultant, and former detective specializing in sex crimes. With past training by a former FBI Behavioral Specialist, Stacy is certified through the National Institute of Truth Verification as an examiner (CVSA- lie detector). Stacy has also been assigned to a federal drug task in the investigations of numerous homicides. In 2002, Stacy Dittrich received the Victim’s of Crime Award from former Ohio Attorney General, Jim Petro and is a certified law enforcement instructor.

Stacy Dittrich is the author of the upcoming CeeCee Gallagher thriller series about a female detective. She and her first novel in the series, The Devil’s Closet, were recently featured on CNN’s Nancy Grace. Based on an actual case Stacy investigated, the novel debuts in October, 2008, followed by Mary Jane’s Grave, the second in the CeeCee Gallagher series, debuting in June 2009. Stacy’s first true-crime book, Murder Behind the Badge, will debut in September, 2009 (Prometheus) and her memoir, “Stumbling Along the Beat: A true story of a policewoman’s journey,” debuts in Spring 2010.

Stacy Dittrich is a member of the International Thriller Writer’s Association, Sisters in Crime, and is a regular contributor on Women in Crime Ink, a new web blog by an impressive group of award-winning true-crime authors, print and broadcast journalists, crime novelists, producers for CNN and CBS News, television personalities, and criminal justice professionals. Stacy is also a guest contributor at OfficerResource.com. Stacy is co-owner of Justice Interrupted, LLC; an investigation and media team along with LA Deputy District Attorney, Robin Sax, and famed author and violence expert, Susan Murphy-Milano.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the
Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/11/15/A-Conversation-with-Stacy-Dittrich

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Friday, November 07, 2008

Calming Down: Could Sedative Drugs Be a Less-Lethal Option?

When law enforcement officers face a critical situation that puts innocent people at risk of injury or death, what options do they have to diffuse the situation and save lives?

Russian Special Forces faced just such a situation in October 2002, when 50 Chechen terrorists stormed a Moscow theater and held more than 800 civilians hostage with guns and explosives for nearly three days. Russian forces decided to use a gas to subdue the terrorists, leading to the release of hundreds of hostages. Unfortunately, at least 129 hostages died during the raid or in the following days. Some reports cited the effects of the gas — combined with the hostages' poor physical condition and inadequate medical treatment following the rescue — as contributing to the victims' cause of death.

The siege of the Moscow theater raises questions for
law enforcement in this country. Might calmative agents be a viable option for officers to safely and effectively respond to critical situations?

READ ON
http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/journals/261/calmatives.htm

DNA Solves Property Crimes (But Are We Ready for That?)

The study, funded by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and evaluated by the Urban Institute, compared burglary investigations that used only traditional police practices to burglary investigations in which DNA evidence was also collected and analyzed. The study revealed that, when DNA was added to traditional property crime investigations:

More than twice as many suspects were identified.
Twice as many suspects were arrested.
More than twice as many cases were accepted for prosecution.

The DNA Field Experiment also found that suspects were five times as likely to be identified through DNA evidence than through fingerprints; blood evidence was more effective in solving property crimes than other biological evidence, particularly evidence from items that were handled or touched by the suspect; and evidence collected by forensic technicians was no more likely to result in a suspect being identified than evidence collected by
police officers.

READ ON
http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/journals/261/dna-solves-property-crimes.htm

Expert Systems Help Labs Process DNA Samples

Criminal justice professionals who work in the field of DNA analysis know that a backlog of convicted offender samples exists in our nation's laboratories. It takes a long time to analyze a DNA sample of a convicted offender. Two forensic analysts must visually review the sample and apply a set of standard operating procedures that can have many sets of rules. The procedures can be difficult to apply consistently. After the review is complete, the data must be entered into the national database.

Completing all the steps quickly is a formidable challenge.

New software programs called "expert systems" are helping increase the speed of the review process. Expert systems capture all possible circumstances that experts encounter when they do their jobs and dictate what the appropriate responses should be. For
forensic analysts, expert systems not only allow them to get consistent, accurate results more quickly, they also help them review and upload many DNA profiles into the national database faster

READ ON
http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/journals/260/expert-systems.htm

Medical Panel Issues Interim Findings on Stun Gun Safety

During the three-year period from 2003 to 2005, 47 states and the District of Columbia reported 2,002 arrest-related deaths to the Bureau of Justice Statistics' Deaths in Custody Reporting Program. For many years, police leaders have sought alternatives to lethal force and better methods to subdue individuals to limit injuries and death.

Less-lethal devices have been used by
law enforcement for decades; during the early 1990s, pepper spray became the less-lethal option of choice for law enforcement and corrections agencies. Although pepper spray is inherently safer than lethal-force options and may be preferable to blunt-force methods, many advocates were concerned that pepper spray was associated with in-custody deaths. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) reviewed those cases and, in 2003, issued a report that found pepper spray was safe and effective.

READ ON
http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/journals/261/stun-gun-safety.htm

Tuesday, November 04, 2008

American Heroes Story Contest

Law enforcement, fire, military and other emergency services personnel are our American Heroes. Did one of your parents, a sibling, a friend or even an anonymous American Hero touch your life? Who is your American Hero and what is their story? American Heroes Press is looking for the best stories about our heroes. You don't have to be a member of the law enforcement, fire, military or emergency services community to enter. You simply need to share your story concerning these unique individuals – whether funny, compelling or truly life-altering

The contest launches Nov. 3, 2008. We will accept submissions through Jan. 31, 2009. Winners will be announced April 1, 2009.

Grand Prize
One Grand-Prize-winning story will be selected. The author of the story will receive the following prizes:

Choice of $200 cash, or $250 credit toward an American Heroes Publishing package
Featured spot for his/her Grand-Prize winning story in the contest anthology
Printed and bound copy of the finished anthology

Runner-Up
One Runner-Up-winning story will be selected. The author of the story will receive the following prizes:

Choice of $100 cash, or $150 credit toward an American Heroes Publishing package
Featured spot for his/her Runner-Up winning story in the contest anthology
Printed and bound copy of the finished anthology

Finalists
Fifteen Finalist stories will be selected. Each finalist author will receive the following prizes:

Inclusion of his/her winning story in the contest anthology
Printed and bound copy of the finished anthology

All participants will be eligible to receive an electronic copy of the finished anthology.

CLICK HERE FOR CONTEST DETAILS

About American Heroes Press
American Heroes Press is more than just a means of publishing your book. It's a growing, active and innovative community of writers. Retired police Lt. Raymond E. Foster of the Los Angeles Police Department started this community in 2003. Today it offers a brand of publishing designed specifically for true American Heroes: police, military, firefighters and emergency workers. As an American Hero, great things are accomplished through teamwork. This community – this team – is here to help you achieve success with your literary work.

More information about American Heroes Press can be found at:
www.americanheroespress.com

Sunday, November 02, 2008

Law Enforcement Intelligence Operations

On November 7, 2008, Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole will feature a conversation with Captain Franks S. Root, Arizona Department of Public Safety (ret.) on law enforcement intelligence operations.

Program Date: November 7, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic:
Law Enforcement Intelligence Operations
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/11/08/Law-Enforcement-Intelligence-Operations

About the Guest
Frank S. Root has more than 35 years in law enforcement and intelligence operations with special emphasis on complex intelligence investigations organization and case management. During his law enforcement career he worked for the Arizona Department of Public Safety (20 years, retired as Captain); San Luis Obispo Sheriff’s Office (Automation and Crime Analysis Unit); and, State of California, Division of Investigation (conducting criminal investigations involving identity theft, insurance, and consumer fraud)

Frank S. Root is the author of Law Enforcement Intelligence Critical Elements which “is described as a publication designed to demonstrate how to identify, develop, and deliver the various intelligence-related products and services required to effectively support law enforcement intelligence and operational managers at each management level within an agency.”

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the
Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/11/08/Law-Enforcement-Intelligence-Operations

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530