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Thursday, August 28, 2008

Anderson School of Management Adopts Leadership Book

Editor's Note: The authors are retired law enforcement personnel.

August 28, 2008 (Alburquerque, NM) David Schmidly became the 20th president of the University of New Mexico in 2007. It is his third university presidency. When Schmidly came to the campus to meet with students he told them he planned to teach as part of his duties. He is an internationally respected researcher who has written 9 natural history and conservation books about mammals and more than 200 scientific articles. This fall Schimidly is teaching a seminar course on
leadership at the Anderson School of Management.

There are 53 students enrolled in the course, which will use as a text
Leadership: Texas Hold ‘Em Style by Dr. Andrew J. Harvey and Raymond E. Foster. In this lecture, Schmidly talks about how he became a leader.

About the
leadership: Texas Hold em Style
Using poker as analogy for
leadership, Captain Andrew Harvey, CPD (ret.), Ed.D. and Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA found the right mix of practical experience and academic credentials to write a definitive book for leaders. Working together, Harvey and Foster have written leadership: Texas Hold em Style. Most often leaders find they are given a set of resources people, equipment, funds, experience and a mission. As Foster noted, "You're dealt a certain hand. How you play that hand as a leader determines your success."

About the Authors
Dr. Andrew J. Harvey served in law enforcement for 25 years, the last 12 as a captain with a Southern California
police agency. He holds bachelors and masters degrees from Cal State Los Angeles, and an educational doctorate in the field of organizational leadership from Pepperdine University. He is a graduate of the FBI National Academy, the California POST Command College, the West Point leadership Program, and is recognized in California as a master instructor.

Dr. Harvey is an experienced college educator, currently serving as a professor at the University of Phoenix, and as a faculty advisor at the Union Institute and University. He has been published numerous times in national and international publications. He is a recognized expert in
leadership and career development, and has served as an instructor in command leadership at the Los Angeles Police Department Academy. He has appeared as a leadership authority on television and radio, including the internationally-broadcast Bloomberg Business Television Show, and the nationally syndicated Joey Reynolds Radio Show.

His first book, The Call to Lead: How Ordinary People Become Extraordinary Leaders, received national attention. The book shows the way for leaders toward ethical and competent
leadership. Through his company, Andrew Harvey Seminars, he provides leadership training and consulting to individuals and organizations throughout the nation.



Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the
Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelors from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Masters Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton. He has completed his doctoral course work in business research. Raymond is a graduate of the West Point leadership program and has attended law enforcement, technology and leadership programs such as the National Institute for Justice, Technology Institute, Washington, DC.

Raymond is currently a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, technology and
leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement. His first book, Police Technology (Prentice Hall, July 2004) is used in over 100 colleges and universities nationwide.

More Information about the Book:
www.pokerleadership.com

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

10th annual Technologies for Critical Incident Preparedness Conference

PRESENTED BY:
The U.S. Departments of
Justice (DOJ), (DHS), and Defense (DoD)

SPONSORED BY:
DOJ's Office of
Justice Programs' National Institute of Justice, DHS's Science and Technology Directorate, and DoD's Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense and Americas' Security Affairs

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH:
FBI
Law Enforcement Executive Development Association
InterAgency Board for Interoperability and Standardization
International Association of Chiefs of
Police
International Association of Emergency Managers
National Emergency Management Association
National
Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center
National Sheriffs' Association
Public Safety and Security Institute for
Technology
Technical Support Working Group
US Army RDECOM's Natick Research Development and Engineering Center


CONFERENCE MISSION:
The 10th annual Technologies for Critical Incident Preparedness Conference and Exposition highlights DOJ, DHS and DoD's
Technology and training tools currently available and being developed for the emergency responder community, as well as provides a forum for emergency responders to discuss best practices and exchange information. With 1,500 attendees and 200 exhibits and demonstrations expected, this conference offers a unique opportunity for emergency responders, business and industry, academia and local, tribal, state, and Federal stakeholders to network, exchange ideas and address common critical incident Technology and preparedness needs, protocols, and solutions.

DATES/LOCATION:
October 29-31, 2008
Hyatt Regency Chicago
Hotel reservations now open at www.ctc.org

SESSION TOPICS (see www.ctc.org for a listing of all confirmed speakers):
General Sessions:


Best Practices and Lessons Learned in the I-35 Bridge Collapse in Minneapolis
The National Guard's Role in Supporting State and Local Emergency Responders
Intelligence Dissemination: The Federal Role in Getting Intelligence to Front Line Officers on the Street
Special Session:

Thursday, 10/30/08 (Lunch)
Virtual Alabama: One Year Later
Breakout Sessions:

Wednesday, 10/29/08 (8am-5pm)
Communications Interoperability 1: Policy Updates
Critical Infrastructure Protection
Indoor Personnel Location and Tracking Technologies
School and Campus Safety and Security: Best Practices
VBIED Live (Mock) Exercise (open to qualified public safety personnel only)
Federal Resources 1: DOJ & DoD
WMD: CBRN
National Incident Management System (NIMS)
Forensics
How to Turn Research Into Reality: Interactive Group Discussion
Thursday, 10/30/08 (9am-5pm)
Integrating Private Sector Security
Personal Protective Equipment
Communications Interoperability 2: Technologies
Cyber Security 1: The Federal, Sector and State Perspectives
Disaster Management
The SAFETY Act
Friday, 10/31/08 (8:30am-12:30pm)
Intelligence and Information Sharing: State/Local Success Stories
Federal Resources 2: DHS
Cyber Security 2: Technologies
Use of Robots in Preparedness and Response
Education and Training
Keynotes:


Jeffrey L. Sedgwick, Ph.D., Acting Assistant Attorney General for
Justice Programs and Director, Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of Justice
Paul McHale, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense and Americas' Security Affairs, U.S. Department of Defense
Jay M. Cohen, Under Secretary, Science &
Technology Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security
ATTENDEES:

$250: Local, Tribal, State & Federal Government
$350: Non-profit/Academia/Federally designated 8(A)'s
$550: Private Sector/Industry/Other

Attendee registration is now open at www.ctc.org.

EXHIBITORS:

$1,800: Local, Tribal, State & Federal Government/Non-profit/Academia
$2,000: Private Sector/Industry/Other

Booth sales are now open at www.ctc.org.

CONFERENCE WEBSITE: www.ctc.org

Thursday, August 21, 2008

Public Safety Technology in the News

New Law to Set Voluntary Standards for 911 Dispatchers
Tallahassee.com, (08/03/2008), Nic Corbett

A new Florida State law, effective October 1, 2008, mandates that the Florida Department of Health establish criteria for certification of 911 dispatchers. The city of
Tallahassee and Leon County are waiting to see what requirements are spelled out as part of the certification program. At present, the new standard calls for slightly more than 1 month of training for dispatchers. City police dispatchers, however, receive 6 months of training, which includes 4 to 6 weeks of classroom work. County dispatchers receive 4 months of training and officials are about to include classroom instruction as part of the county training. Construction of a new joint dispatch center for city and county dispatchers continues, which officials believe will make the system more efficient.
www.tallahassee.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/200808030200/BREAKINGNEWS/80717010

DHS Plans to Unify Emergency Communications
FCW.COM, (08/01/2008), Alice Lipowicz

The National Emergency Communications Plan mandates that cities most at risk for terrorist attacks must be able to demonstrate interoperability among agencies by 2010. The plan has been in development since 2002 by the U.S. Department of
Homeland Security and is a direct response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. Goals for the plan include that by 2010, 90 percent of the 60 high-risk areas designated under the Urban Area Security Initiative demonstrate interoperability within 1 hour after a multijurisdictional event. By 2011, 25 percent of all urban jurisdictions must demonstrate communications capabilities 1 hour after a routine event. Finally, by 2013, 75 percent of all jurisdictions must have demonstrated response level communications 3 hours after an event. This plan is in line with the National Response Framework, National Incident Management System, National Preparedness Guideline, and Target Capabilities List, and was developed with input from practitioners and manufactures in the area of communications.
www.fcw.com/online/news/153354-1.html

Information Sharing Effectiveness Questioned by GAO
Homeland Security Today, (07/24/2008), Anthony L. Kimery

Nearly 7 years since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, State and local agencies are not the only entities questioning the impact of Federal information sharing initiatives, as well as other related reform programs. The U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) reports that the government cannot in fact assess the impact of information sharing or its effectiveness at preventing terrorism. The government needs to create milestones, results, and an overall program definition in order to implement the program successfully. According to GAO, steps have been taken to better implement the Information Sharing Environments (ISE) scope, but elements still require implementation.
hstoday.us/content/view/4394/149/

Fingerprints Provide Clues to More Than Just Identity
Science News, (08/07/2008)

Staff at Purdue University have developed a new
technology that is capable of analyzing fingerprints gathered at a crime scene to determine what other materials were left behind with the fingerprint. Along with this development, the technology is also capable of differentiating between two overlapping fingerprints left at a scene. The technology relies on the compounds that comprise a fingerprint; some compounds are natural while others are based on what was handled by the person leaving the print. It is because of this uniqueness of these compounds that the technology is capable of separating multiple prints. The Purdue team's findings will be published in the August 8, 2008 issue of Science.
esciencenews.com/articles/2008/08/07/fingerprints.provide.clues.more.just.identity

West Midlands
police Launch 'Untouchables' Team to Tackle Gangsters
SundayMercury.com, (08/02/2008), Ben Goldby

The Serious and
Organized Crime Unit, established by West Midlands police, is tasked with the mission of apprehending the most dangerous criminals in the area. The group will be used to target gang leaders, money launderers, street thugs, and drug dealers, and can use whatever laws are at its disposal to apprehend these individuals. The task force can use crimes such as littering or driving while disqualified to make a successful arrest and subsequent prosecution. Since the unit's inception it has already made progress in the region by making two successful gun seizures and the region's largest marijuana bust. The unit consists of five teams that are not based solely in one location, but rather are capable of moving to those areas where the need exists. The unit stresses it will work with those people trying to leave the gang lifestyle, but will go after all members of organized crime with all legal means.
www.sundaymercury.net/news/midlands-news/2008/08/02/west-midlands-police-launch-untouchables-team-to-tackle-gangsters-66331-21455817/

City Would Photograph Every Vehicle Entering Manhattan and Sniff Out Radioactivity
The New York Times, (08/12/2008), Al Baker

The
New York Police Department is developing a proposal dubbed Operation Sentinel to further protect the city against terrorist attacks. The program would rely on technologies, such as cameras for still photos, license plate scanners, and radiation sensors. Each vehicle crossing into the city via bridge or tunnel will be photographed and have its license plate scanned and will be checked for radioactive materials. The captured information will be time stamped and the data will then be relayed to the command post in Lower Manhattan, where it will be indexed for at least 1 month storage. If the data is linked to a suspicious vehicle or to a case, the data will be stored longer, but if no connections are made the data will be erased. The proposal is part of a 36-page plan for security at the site of ground zero, and it is hoped to be a step toward adoption of a plan similar to the system implemented in London.
www.nytimes.com/2008/08/12/nyregion/12cars.html?_r=1&ref=nyregion&oref=slogin

police, Firefighters Get New Tool in Responding to Emergencies
phillyBurbs.com, (08/14/2008), Melissa Hayes

First responders in Burlington County, Pennsylvania, will have the ability to view three-dimensional images of locations throughout the county. The county purchased the software from Pictometry International, Inc. Users will have the ability to view properties or areas from multiple angles and be able to zoom in and out on the building, which can help save time and lives during an emergency. Countywide leasing was offered by Pictometry so that other county agencies and municipalities can take advantages of the software. County 911 dispatchers will be trained immediately on the new system.
www.phillyburbs.com/pb-dyn/news/112-08142008-1576662.html

GE Security Advanced
technology Video Surveillance Solutions Help Support Reduction in Crime at LA's MacArthur Park
Centredaily.com, (08/13/2008)

In an effort to provide a safer environment and efficient response during the 2008 May Day Immigration Rally, the
Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) worked with GE Security to upgrade the security system. The upgrade includes the latest in video management and in stationary and pan, tilt, and zoom cameras to help capture footage of the MacArthur Park area. According to LAPD, surveillance posted at the park has resulted in a steady decline of criminal activity in the area. The system used to update MacArthur Park includes cameras hooked to a wireless system using fiber optic cable. Information is transferred to Rampart Station, located several miles from the park, on the wireless system. The system allows police and other first responders to be more efficient with personnel deployment.
www.centredaily.com/business/technology/story/773913.html

Va. DNA Project Is in Uncharted Territory
The Washington Post, (08/17/2008), Maria Glod

Thirty-three years after a rape and murder case had been closed and a man convicted, newly discovered DNA evidence has led to the arrest of another person in relation to the crime. This finding is part of a 3 year, $1.4 million project by the Virginia State Police to reexamine bodily fluid samples from roughly 400 cases involving rape, murder, or other serious crimes from more than 30 years ago. As of yet, no determinations have been made regarding anyone being wrongly convicted. However, there have been at least eight instances in which the convicted persons' DNA does not match evidence from the scene. Defense lawyers and legal scholars are trying to help make the process more clear and open to those convicted.
www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/08/16/AR2008081602216.html

police Cameras Scan Plates for Stolen Cars
Azcentral.com, (08/14/2008), Michael Ferraresi

The
Arizona Department of Public Safety Vehicle Theft Task Force has been using Automatic License Plate Recognition (ALPR) cameras and software to help investigators do their job more efficiently. According to staff, on a good day an officer may be able to manually process 400 plates, but with the new system in place an officer can now process 5,000 plates a day. Phoenix police share a unit between two precincts, and one precinct is attempting to get grant funding to purchase its own unit. The Arizona Department of Public Safety hopes to be able to deploy an additional 25 mobile ALPR cameras during the next 2 months.
www.azcentral.com/community/phoenix/articles/2008/08/14/20080814phx-autotheft0815.html

Wednesday, August 20, 2008

International Journal of Emergency Mental Health

The International Journal of Emergency Mental Health is a practice-oriented resource for active professionals in the fields of psychology, law enforcement, public safety, emergency medical services, mental health, education, criminal justice, social work, pastoral counseling, and the military. The journal publishes articles dealing with traumatic stress, crisis intervention, specialized counseling and psychotherapy, suicide intervention, crime victim trauma, hostage crises, disaster response and terrorism, bullying and school violence, workplace violence and corporate crisis management, medical disability stress, armed services trauma and military psychology, helper stress and vicarious trauma, family crisis intervention, and the education and training of emergency mental health professionals. The journal publishes several types of articles:

Research reports: Empirical studies that contribute to the knowledge and understanding of traumatic disability syndromes and effective interventions.

Integrative reviews: Articles that summarize and explain a topic of general or specialized interest to emergency medical, mental health, or public safety professionals.

Practice guides: Reports of existing, developing, or proposed programs that provide practical guidelines, procedures, and strategies for working emergency service and mental health professionals.

Case studies: Clinical or field reports of professional experiences that illustrate principles and/or practice guidelines for crisis intervention and emergency mental health.

Book and media reviews: Reviews of books, films, DVDs, or electronic media of relevance to emergency response and mental health professionals.

First person: Personal accounts of dealing with traumatic stress and crises, either as a victim or caregiver, that provide insight into coping and recovery.

The International Journal of Emergency Mental Health is your place to say something that can make a difference in the lives of victims and helpers and have a real-world impact on the daily practice of emergency medical, public safety, and mental health services.

Complete Instructions for Authors can be found on-line at:
www.chevronpublishing.com/authorinfo.pdf

Dynamic Leadership for Law Enforcement

The Broomfield Police Department, CO, is hosting an intensive 3-day Dynamic Leadership for Law Enforcement course from October 13th to October 15th 2008. Designed for new and experienced sworn and civilian lead persons, first-line, and middle-management level supervisors, the course will be presented by the Alpha Group Center for Crime and Intelligence Analysis and taught by Chief Karin Montejo, a 28-year veteran of the Miami-Dade Police Department.

Recognized internationally for her management expertise, Chief Montejo has presented seminars and workshops both nationally and internationally for a variety of
Law Enforcement organizations including the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

This three-day (24 hour) "hands-on" program provides participants with techniques they can use immediately to define their
Leadership styles, build highly productive teams, and motivate their people to superb levels of peak performance. Students also learn how to adopt the language of Leadership, how to eliminate speech habits and behavioral gestures that sap their power and diminish their credibility, and how to use a variety of tips and techniques to identify and resolve a multitude of workplace problems.
Additionally, participants will be shown how to identify and respond to various personality types and how to establish effective communications between them.

Presented in a "learn-by-doing" format, the course additionally focuses on how to transition successfully from being "one of the guys" on Friday to being "the boss" on Monday, how to gain the respect and cooperation of team members, how to resolve conflicts, and how to get people to work together harmoniously to accomplish organizational goals. As such, others who will benefit from this course include current supervisors who want to broaden their knowledge of and increase their exposure to a variety of
Leadership skills and techniques, and those planning to apply for a supervisory position who desire to increase their competitive edge.

Each participant will receive a copy of Chief Montejo's Dynamic
Leadership for Law Enforcement publication as well as a CD containing many public domain and government references highlighted throughout the course. Also included on the CD is a "favorites" folder that contains a multitude of Internet links that can easily be added to Internet browsers.

Tuition for the course is $425 and includes the three days of instruction, the text, and all related course materials.

To obtain a course brochure, additional information, or to register for the class, interested persons should contact Diana Olson of the Alpha Group at (909) 484-2169 or contact by e-mail at: crimecrush@aol.com or Tim Black, Broomfield
Police Department, 720-887-2080, email tblack@broomfield.org Additional information about the content of the course may be found on the Alpha Group Center website at www.alphagroupcenter.com

Friday, August 15, 2008

Military Develops New Sexual Assault Prevention Strategy

By Gerry J. Gilmore
American Forces Press Service

Aug. 14, 2008 - The U.S.
military will debut a new strategy next year that involves troops being on guard to protect fellow servicemembers from potential sexual assault, a senior Defense Department official said here today. The Pentagon has been developing the new strategy over the past year, and it will be implemented in October 2009, Dr. Kaye Whitley, director of the Defense Department's sexual assault Prevention and Response Office, told American Forces Press Service and Pentagon Channel reporters today.

"Bystander intervention" means servicemembers watch out for each other to prevent
sexual assault, Whitley emphasized. "It's very similar to what they do on the battlefield," she pointed out. "You look out for your buddy, so let us look out for our buddy in other ways, as well."

The
military services already have elements of the bystander prevention strategy in place, Whitley said.

Another new initiative being worked involves implementation of a way for National Guard and reserve members to report
sexual assault anonymously, Whitley reported. Active-duty troops already have the restricted reporting option, Whitley said. This policy allows servicemembers to get the benefit of counseling and other services without triggering an investigation. About 1,800 sexual assault victims came forward after the restricted information policy took effect for active-duty servicemembers, she said.

"I believe that that is 1,800 people who would not have come forward otherwise," Whitley said. "Those 1,800 people got counseling, medical care and assistance."

Whitley said reserve-component members had been required to fill out official paperwork reporting
sexual assault, a process that destroys all confidentiality. A change in the works will eliminate the requirement to fill out such forms, she said.

These and other issues, Whitley said, were discussed among some-300 attendees at the department's annual
sexual assault response coordinators' conference that was held July 22-24 in Tampa.

The effectiveness of the department's
sexual assault prevention program, Whitley said, ultimately depends upon the quality of the coordinators and their relationships with military commanders.

"I would go as far to say that the program is only as good as the sexual assault response coordinator," Whitley said.

The second part of program success, she noted, is predicated on the level of participation by commanders. "This is a command program, and we have to have command support for this program to work," Whitley said. "Where we see it work best is when the [sexual assault response coordinator] and the commander work in unison."

Sunday, August 10, 2008

Criminal Intelligence Analyst Course

The Canadian Pacific Railway Police Service, Vancouver, BC is hosting an intensive 5-day Criminal Intelligence Analysis Course for intelligence officers and crime and intelligence analysts from October 20th to October 24th 2008. The course will be presented by the Alpha Group Center for Crime and Intelligence Analysis and taught by Warren Sweeney, a thirty-year veteran of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and former Intelligence Analysis Coordinator for the RCMP Canadian Police College in Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

This will be a "hands-on" course that takes a "learn-by-doing," practical approach to training. Students will actually perform tasks associated with intelligence analysis work. Each participant will also receive a copy of The Intelligence Analyst's Sourcebook. Written by Warren Sweeney, this manual explains how to conduct, prepare, and present intelligence to enhance the investigative and decision-making process.

Participants will be taught how to turn data into information; how to distinguish differences between Tactical, Strategic, and Operational Intelligence; how to overcome resistance to the intelligence process, how to establish links between people, organizations, and events; how to chart events, commodity flow, and activities within the
Criminal organization; how to present intelligence effectively in oral and written reports; how to use the power of the computer to assist the intelligence function; and money laundering secrets and techniques.

Tuition for the course is $525 and includes the week of instruction, the text, and related course materials. The course also fulfills the requirements of the California Department of
Justice Certified Crime and Intelligence Analysis Program and may be used for Certification purposes. It is beneficial, but not required, to bring a laptop computer with you, which will permit the installation of a graphics program: ABC SnapGraphics 1.0.

To obtain a course brochure or to register for the course, please contact Diana Olson of the Alpha Group at (909) 484-2169 e-mail at:
crimecrush@aol.com or contact Cst Ron Chomyn, Canadian Pacific Railway Police Service, SK, 306-931-7414, fax 306-931-7412 email ron_chomyn@cpr.ca Additional information about the content of the course can also be found on the Alpha Group website at www.alphagroupcenter.com

Thursday, August 07, 2008

Criminal Intelligence Analysis Course

The Richardson Police Department, TX, is hosting an intensive 5-day criminal Intelligence Analysis Course for intelligence officers and Crime and intelligence analysts from November 17th to November 21st 2008. The course will be presented by the Alpha Group Center for Crime and Intelligence Analysis and taught by Warren Sweeney, a thirty-year veteran of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and former Intelligence Analysis Coordinator for the RCMP Canadian Police College in Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

This will be a "hands-on" course that takes a "learn-by-doing," practical approach to training. Students will actually perform tasks associated with intelligence analysis work. Each participant will also receive a copy of The Intelligence Analyst's Sourcebook. Written by Warren Sweeney, this manual explains how to conduct, prepare, and present intelligence to enhance the investigative and decision-making process.

Participants will be taught how to turn data into information; how to distinguish differences between Tactical, Strategic, and Operational Intelligence; how to overcome resistance to the intelligence process, how to establish links between people, organizations, and events; how to chart events, commodity flow, and activities within the
criminal organization; how to present intelligence effectively in oral and written reports; how to use the power of the computer to assist the intelligence function; and money laundering secrets and techniques.

Tuition for the course is $525 and includes the week of instruction, the text, and related course materials. The course also fulfills the requirements of the California Department of Justice Certified
Crime and Intelligence Analysis Program and may be used for Certification purposes. It is beneficial, but not required, to bring a laptop computer with you, which will permit the installation of a graphics program: ABC SnapGraphics 1.0.

To obtain a course brochure or to register for the course, please contact Diana Olson of the Alpha Group at (909) 484-2169 e-mail at:
crimecrush@aol.com or contact Patricia Huesca-Dorantes PHd, Richardson Police Service, TX, 972-744-4742, fax 972-744-5921 email patricia.huesca-dorantes@cor.gov. Additional information about the content of the course can also be found on the Alpha Group website at www.alphagroupcenter.com.

Crime Analysis Training

The Office of the Insurance Commissioner - Special Investigations Unit will host a Crime Analysis Applications Course from March 30 to April 3, 2009. The course will be presented by Steve Gottlieb, Executive Director of the Alpha Group Center for Crime and Intelligence Analysis Training, and may be used for Certification purposes in the Certificate in Crime and Intelligence Program offered by the California Department of Justice and the California State University system.

This will be a "hands-on" applications course which takes a "learning-by-doing," practical approach to training. Students will actually perform the tasks associated with crime analysis work. Each participant will also receive a copy of Mr. Gottlieb's book, "
Crime Analysis: From First Report to Final Arrest," a textbook over 600 pages which explains how to design, implement, and operate a crime analysis program, and how to use a wide variety of analytical techniques to forecast when and where criminals are likely to strike again. Each participant will also receive a copy of Mr. Gottlieb's 150-page step-by-step "Crime Analysis Study Guide and Workbook," which will be used throughout the class. Tuition is $525.00 and includes the week of instruction, the text, workbook, and a wealth of handout materials.

To obtain a course brochure or to register for the course, please contact Kristi Barbieri at the Office of the Insurance Commissioner - Special Investigations Unit, by phone (360-586-2571) or email
kristib@oic.wa.gov. Additional information about the content of the course can also be found on the Alpha Group website at www.alphagroupcenter.com

Tuesday, August 05, 2008

Criminal Investigative Analysis Course

The Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office, FL, is hosting an intensive 5-day Advanced Criminal Investigative Analysis (Psychological Profiling) course for rape and homicide investigators September 22 - September 26, 2008.

The course will be taught by Phoebe L.Kelsoe, Ph.D., of the Alpha Group Center for Crime and Intelligence Analysis Training. A professional profiler and the former Manager of the
Crime Analysis Unit, Special Investigations Bureau for the Riverside County, California Sheriff's Department, Dr. Kelsoe currently consults and instructs on practical applications of Criminal investigative analysis techniques for law enforcement organizations throughout theUnited States and Canada.

Designed primarily for investigators and crime analysts who are responsible for investigating or assisting in the investigation of
homicide, in-class projects also deal with the crime of rape. Other relevant issues are examined as well. For example, you will learn how to identify the personality and behavioral characteristics of the victim and the offender in child abductions, how to identify the physical, behavioral, and personality characteristics of the victim and the offender in child abductions, how to identify the physical, behavioral, and personality characteristics of offenders who attack and kill elderly women, and how to analyze information contained in police reports to actually develop a profile that describes the type of offender who most likely committed the crime.

The course takes a very practical "learn-by-doing" approach to training, which, through lectures and class exercises, provides students with numerous opportunities to actually profile serial rape and
homicide suspects. Each participant will receive a copy of the "Advanced Criminal Investigative Analysis Study Guide and Workbook." This manual provides numerous pages of class notes and supplemental reading material that will be used extensively throughout the course. Students will also be provided with a copy of "Case Management for Missing Children homicide Investigation." This booklet provides a wealth of information about offenders who commit child homicides, their victims, crime scene patterns, violent acts, and their motivations for committing such violent crimes.

Tuition for the course is $525 and includes the week of instruction, the Study Guide, the booklet, and related course materials. The course also may fulfill your state's peace officer commission (POST, TCLOSE, etc.) requirements for continuing education or training hours.

To obtain a course brochure or to register for the course, please contact Dana Raufiefen,
Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office, by phone 561-688-3598 (fax 561-688-3586), or by email at raufeifend@pbso.org Diana Olson of the Alpha Group at (909) 484-2169 or contact by e-mail at: crimecrush@aol.com

Friday, August 01, 2008

Sexual Violence and Evidence Collection

August 13, 2008: 2 pm – 4 pm (EDT)
Online event. Registration required, and free of charge.

This event is the second of four in the Series on Sexual Violence, sponsored by the Government Innovators Network and the National Institute of
Justice. Additional event topics include sexual assault on college campuses, sexual violence and evidence collection, and a discussion about international policy. Ample time will be allocated for audience Q&A.

Those who register for this event will be notified as subsequent events are scheduled (approximately one per month June through September).

Federal legislation requiring states to fund "Jane Doe rape kits" will be enacted this coming year, a milestone that raises awareness of the need for careful and comprehensive evidence collection in sexual assault cases, and provides an excellent opportunity to reexamine best practices.

Law Enforcement officers play an important role in preserving the chain of evidence in sexual assault cases. Successful preservation requires that the officer works closely with Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE).

This online event will examine how
Law Enforcement can work with SANE nurses in order to collect sufficient evidence and provide quality care to the victim. The panel will discuss the importance of DNA collection and non-contamination, highlight legal considerations, and shed light on the "Jane Doe" legislation.

The discussion will be moderated by Sergeant Joanne Archambault, Executive Director for End Violence Against Women (EVAW) International. The panel includes:

Sergeant Jim Markey -
Phoenix Police Department, Adult Sex Crime Unit
Jennifer Pierce-Weeks - SANE nurse; President-elect, International Association of Forensic Nurses
Roger Canaff - Deputy Chief, Sex Offender Management Unit, New York State Attorney General's Office

MORE INFORMATION
http://www.innovations.harvard.edu/spotlight.html?id=1421&preview=0