Amazon

Monday, June 30, 2008

Program Trains Auxiliary Police Officers in Afghanistan

By Navy Lt. Neil Myers
Special to American Forces Press Service

June 30, 2008 - A Kunar Provincial Reconstruction Team program here trains Afghan men to become part of the Afghan National Auxiliary
Police force. The three-week Police Training and Advisory Team program was conducted at Camp Wright, near Asadabad, and is the only one of its kind in the province. The trainees come from every district in the province and are housed at the Asadabad police headquarters during their training.

"Many of the police trainees arrive at the ANAP course with poor discipline,"
Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Carlos A. Ramirez, of the Kunar PRT, said. "We teach them discipline through repetitive activities and specially designed physical exercise."

After physical exercise, the trainees attend classroom training led by one of three Afghan police officer instructors attached to the
Police Training and Advisory Team program.

Trainees learn
traffic accident investigation, weapons familiarization, domestic violence investigation, vehicle searches, community policing, explosives detection, the penal code, baton training, handcuffing, and a variety of other law enforcement skills.

"I think it's good to have our three Afghan teachers leading the lecture part of the training, because they speak the Pashto language, and about half of the trainees speak very little English,"
Navy Seaman Brian L. Boyd Jr. of the Kunar PRT said.

The
Police Training and Advisory Team military staff, assisted by four interpreters, teaches practical, hands-on training in the afternoon.

"Initially the trainees are reserved, due to the fact that for many, this is their first interaction with coalition forces," Boyd said. "Midway through the class, they interact more with us. By graduation, many of us are good friends. If we maintain this program, Afghanistan will improve, because these trainees want to become [Afghan National Police officers] and truly want their country to succeed."

The goal of coalition forces is to have Afghanistan secure and govern itself. Security is a big issue in Kunar province, and the
police play a huge role toward accomplishing that goal, PRT officials said, and the PTAT contributes to that effort by providing a steady pool of well-trained police officers who are ready to serve their country.

A typical auxiliary police candidate, 36-year-old Ali hails from the Shigal district. He is married and has seven children. Ali is eager to complete the training and eventually get hired by the Afghan National
Police at the end of his three-year auxiliary police contract. He has a positive attitude toward the coalition forces and understands they are here to help him rebuild his country, officials said.

The program also mentors police chiefs.

"We go to every district and survey the police station, meet with the police chief, and ascertain their needs," Ramirez said. "Whether it be facility improvements, more staff or equipment, the PTAT mentors and shows police chiefs how to properly coordinate assistance with other agencies for help run their stations. In some cases, PTAT provides assistance with building upgrades and repairs."

To date, PTAT has trained 290 auxiliary police officers, with 90 more candidates now enrolled.

(
Navy Lt. Neil Myers serves with the Kunar Provincial Reconstruction Team.)

Sunday, June 29, 2008

Leadership Seminars

All leadership seminars are unique and were developed by Dr. Andrew J. Harvey and Raymond E. Foster. The training can include PowerPoint presentations, course workbooks, film clips, and interactive discussion, all presented in a friendly and fun atmosphere conducive to learning. Each course is customized to the degree specified by the client. Classes can have as much or as little custom content as desired. Attendees will come away with practical skill and knowledge that can be immediately put to use within the organization.

Examples of training seminars include:

Action
Leadership:

If a player doesn't realize it's his or her turn to play, the dealer will say, “Your action.”
This one-day course is designed to help current and aspiring leaders to fulfill their ultimate potential in the realm of
leadership by realizing it’s always your action. The course is based on the book Leadership: Texas Hold em Style; and, covers the keys to good leadership through a variety of engaging and entertaining instructional methods.

Made Hand Career Development:

In poker, a made hand is one that does not need to improve to win. As an example, in draw poker, if you had two pairs and another player is drawing for a straight or a flush, you have a made hand because you win even if you don’t draw a card that improves your hand. Conversely, your opponent has a drawing hand, they must draw into a winning combination.

Made Hand Career Development is designed primarily for public sector professionals. The course teaches you how to develop your career to the fullest. Giving you the tools and resources to develop your career into a winning made hand. An organization benefits from this one-day seminar through developing their employees to view their career as journey for which they must be prepared.

More Information:
www.pokerleadership.com/leadership_seminar.html

Crescent City Crime

June 28, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) On July 5, 2008, Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole will feature a conversation with O’Neil De Noux, a police officer-turned-writer. He has worked as a homicide detective and organized crime investigator. He has also been a private investigator, U.S. Army combat photographer, criminal intelligence analyst, newspaper writer, magazine editor, computer graphics designer and creative writing instructor.

Program Date: July 5, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Crescent City Crime
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/07/06/Crescent-City-Crime

About the Guest
As a police officer,
O’Niel De Noux received seven commendations for solving difficult murder cases. In 1981, he was named ‘Homicide Detective of the Year’ for the Jefferson Parish Sheriff’s Office. In 1989, he was proclaimed an ‘Expert Witness’ on the homicide crime scene in Criminal District Court, New Orleans, LA.

O’Niel De Noux’s published novels include: Grim Reaper, The Big Kiss, Blue Orleans, Crescent City Kills and the Big Show. His short story collections include Hollow Point/The Mystery of Rochelle Marais and Lastanza: New Orleans Police Stories; which received an “A” rating from Entertainment Weekly Magazine. O’Niel De Noux adapted one of the Lastanza stories “Waiting for Alaina” into a screenplay, which was filmed in New Orleans and broadcast on local TV in 2001.

In March 2006, New Orleans Confidential, a collection of 1940’s noir private-eye short stories was published by PointBlank Press. According to Weekly, “Former homicide detective De Noux turns out an engaging, fast-paced collection of stories featuring private eye and womanizer extraordinaire Lucien Caye as he tracks philandering husbands, possible murderers and missing cats. Set predominantly against the rich backdrop of 1940s New Orleans, these stories-abounding with ample bosoms and willing women-are fun, and the author knows his stuff when it comes to the Big Easy.” Another Lucien Caye story, The Heart Has Reasons, won the Private Eye Writer’s of America’s prestigious Shamus Award for Best Short Story 2007.

Besides his novels,
O’Neil De Noux has had over 200 short stories published. Until Hurricane Katrina, he taught creative writing and mystery writing courses at the University of New Orleans and Delgado Community College and McNeese State University, Lake Charles, LA, from 1993 to 2005. He is the founding editor of two fiction magazines, Mystery Street and New Orleans Stories.

Currently, O’Neil De Noux has two original short stories Guilty of Dust and Sin and Maria’s Hand available on Amazon Shorts, an audio story “Ankle Biters of Old Arizona; or, Attack of the Wild Chihuahuas (on Sniplits.com) and stories forthcoming in Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine and Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine, as well as a number of anthologies.

After his home was seriously damaged by Hurricane Katrina,
O’Neil De Noux re-settled on the northshore of Lake Pontchartrain in 2006 and returned to law enforcement. He is currently a Police Investigator with the Southeastern Louisiana University Police Department in Hammond, LA.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the
Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Thursday, June 26, 2008

Field Investigation Drug Officer (FIDO) Program

Many drug investigations fail to be prosecuted or are dismissed due to a lack of timely sample analysis. In an effort to combat this problem, the National Forensic Science Technology Center (NFSTC), in partnership with the NLECTC system, and the Forensic Resource Network, has implemented Field Investigation Drug Officer (FIDO) programs at three pilot sites: Utah Bureau of Forensic Services, Oregon State Police, and Philadelphia Police Department.

The aim of the FIDO program is to streamline the adjudication process by allowing certified
law enforcement officers the capability of providing a preliminary identification of the most commonly encountered drugs of abuse. To this end, NFSTC conducted a thorough review of four commercially available field test kits and has created guidance documents for the establishment of FIDO programs. NFSTC will work with the pilot sites to assess how the implementation of the program impacted the laboratories' efficiency, how the agencies ma! y have changed the way that drug cases are address, whether the agencies plan to continue the FIDO program, and how the program affects how FIDO officers process drug cases.

For more information about the field test kit review study and the FIDO program, please contact NFSTC at info@nfstc.org

Saturday, June 21, 2008

Methamphetamine - Community Prevention Tactics

June 20, 2008, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) On June 27, 2008, Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole will feature a conversation with Former San Francisco Police Department Inspector Linda Flanders and Red Wing Police Department Chief of Police Tim Sletten about community prevention tactics and methamphetamine addiction.

Program Date: June 27, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Methamphetamine - Community Prevention Tactics
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/06/28/Methamphetamine-Community-Prevention-Tactics

About the Guests
In the 1970s,
Linda Flanders was the first female police officer to join the Mill Valley police Department (California). By 1980, she had moved across the bay and joined the San Francisco Police Department. During her career she was promoted to the rank of Inspector and trained as a Child Interview Specialist. Linda Flanders worked for several years in the Juvenile Division’s Child Sexual Assault Detail.

Linda Flanders has a degree in Criminal Justice and became a Movement Education Teacher in 1991. Since 1999, she has worked as an independent educational filmmaker and, co-developed the “The Movie Making Process©” as a learning and teaching tool for today’s kids. Using a mix of art education, pop-culture and digital technology the process has developed into the 21st Century Prevention Program. The original work, “The Movie Making Process”© was recently nominated by the State of Wisconsin as their “Most Promising Prevention Program”.

Linda Flanders has published several articles on alternative learning styles and children who exhibit atypical behavior. And, is the author of the self-help Cinema-therapy book for teens Hollywood Endings and How To Get One. The prevention program for communities is called The Northern Lights; Shining The Light on the Meth-edemic and mixes entertainment and education to deal with methamphetamine specifically and addiction in general. Linda Flanders’ current project is to work with communities nationwide on the prevention program and evaluation, document it in a peer-reviewed article and submit the findings to the National Institute of Health as a model program. She is actively looking for communities to join this endeavor. www.taprootinc.com

Chief of Police Tim Sletten worked his way up through the ranks of the Red Wing Police Department (Minnesota) and was appointed Chief in 2004. He is very active with the town’s community groups and a visual presence at all events. As a small town Chief, he’s learning quickly how to deal with global issues at the local level. He’s an advocate for up-to date training, known for addressing community concerns immediately and recognizes the need to connect with young people through their own interests. Of The Northern Lights; Shining The Light on the Meth-edemic project, Chief Tim Sletten said, “This is the first thing I’ve ever seen that was created specifically for the kids.”

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the
Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Sunday, June 15, 2008

The Justice for Sergeant Donald Sowma Petition Drive

On November 19,1976, Don Sowma my husband and father of our four children was shot and murdered in the line of duty as a Police Officer for the City of Cypress. Don was killed by Bobby Joe Denney of Ardmore Oklahoma, Denney was himself a former police officer from Healdton Oklahoma and his father, now deceased was a longtime County Sheriff. During a burglary, Denney dropped his gun from his waistband when he heard police outside, he crawled to the gun and found it and shot my husband as he entered the dark room.

READ ON
http://www.criminaljustice-online.com/forum19/

Saturday, June 14, 2008

Criminal Justice Education

June 13, 2008, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) On June 18, 2008, Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole will feature a conversation with Dr. Gregory D. Herbert, Lt Col, USAF (Ret.) about educational opportunities for both criminal justice and military personnel.

Program Date: June 18, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Criminal Justice Education
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/06/19/The-Watering-Hole

About the Guest
Dr. Gregory D. Herbert, Lt Col, USAF (Ret.) was born in Kalamazoo, MI, in 1956. He graduated from Lakewood High School, St. Petersburg FL, in 1974, and then attended St. Petersburg Junior College where he received his AA degree. He received an
Air Force ROTC scholarship to attend Florida State University where he graduated in 1979 with a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the United States Air Force on August 10, 1979. Dr. Herbert served on active duty for twenty two years initially as a B-52 Navigator/Radar Navigator then as a staff officer at various headquarters such as Strategic Air Command, Air Combat Command, and Air University.

At Air University Dr. Gregory D. Herbert was Chief, Nonresident Curriculum Branch, Air Command and Staff College; as such, he was in charge of the curriculum for over 6,000 nonresident students. While on active duty he earned an MBA from Embry Riddle Aeronautical University and a doctorate in Higher Education from The George Washington University. Upon his retirement from the
Air Force in 2002 Dr. Herbert joined TUI University as a faculty member in the College of Business Administration. Since joining TUI he has taught and developed numerous courses for the college and has assumed administrative duties as the Associate Dean for the Colleges of Business Administration and Information Systems.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant
Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Criminal Justice Education

June 13, 2008, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) On June 18, 2008, Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole will feature a conversation with Dr. Gregory D. Herbert, Lt Col, USAF (Ret.) about educational opportunities for both criminal justice and military personnel.

Program Date: June 18, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Criminal Justice Education
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/06/19/The-Watering-Hole

About the Guest
Dr. Gregory D. Herbert, Lt Col, USAF (Ret.) was born in Kalamazoo, MI, in 1956. He graduated from Lakewood High School, St. Petersburg FL, in 1974, and then attended St. Petersburg Junior College where he received his AA degree. He received an
Air Force ROTC scholarship to attend Florida State University where he graduated in 1979 with a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the United States Air Force on August 10, 1979. Dr. Herbert served on active duty for twenty two years initially as a B-52 Navigator/Radar Navigator then as a staff officer at various headquarters such as Strategic Air Command, Air Combat Command, and Air University.

At Air University Dr. Gregory D. Herbert was Chief, Nonresident Curriculum Branch, Air Command and Staff College; as such, he was in charge of the curriculum for over 6,000 nonresident students. While on active duty he earned an MBA from Embry Riddle Aeronautical University and a doctorate in Higher Education from The George Washington University. Upon his retirement from the
Air Force in 2002 Dr. Herbert joined TUI University as a faculty member in the College of Business Administration. Since joining TUI he has taught and developed numerous courses for the college and has assumed administrative duties as the Associate Dean for the Colleges of Business Administration and Information Systems.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant
Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Thursday, June 12, 2008

Public Safety Technology in the News

Digital Forensics: How Experts Uncover Doctored Images
Scientific American, (06/2008), Hany Farid

Fake photographs are nothing new, but advances in
technology have made it easier to create doctored images and more difficult to detect them. In response, researchers are now advancing the technology used for the forensic analysis of digital images. For example, computer software may be used to analyze photographs for evidence of light source inconsistencies, cloned areas, and appropriate pixel correlations based on the alleged camera. The ability to authenticate digital photographs will support their submission as evidence in a court of law.
www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=digital-image-forensics

Long-Promised, Voice Commands Are Finally Going Mainstream
WIRED, (06/04/2008), Alexander Gelfand

Changes in the power of computers and processors are poised to change the state of voice recognition
technology. The changes could bring voice recognition to the forefront in electronic security, as a validation tool or in user interfaces, and as an appliance option or everyday computer tool. The technology has been available since the 1950s, and with recent gains in programming the technology can interpret human speech more accurately. Commercial applications are already available for portable GPS units and vehicle applications. In Europe, a voice-controlled oven was recently released by Indesit. As a security measure a person's voice is as unique as a fingerprint or iris, so the use of voice recognition for phone or face-to-face applications can be more secure than username or password combinations, or even pin numbers.
www.wired.com/software/coolapps/news/2008/06/speech_tech

MSU Researcher Creates System Helping
Police to Match Tattoos to Suspects
www.newsroom.msu.edu, (05/27/2008)

Biometrics is the ability to use an individual's anatomical or behavioral attributes for identification purposes. A researcher at Michigan State University has expanded that ability to include scars, marks, and tattoo recognition to aid in identifying individuals. Referred to as "Tattoo-ID," the software developed by Anil Jain uses databases of distinguishing marks supplied by the law enforcement community, and each image is linked to a
criminal history for suspects and convicted criminals with similar marks. A search based on an image provided by the user will then produce results relating to similar tattoos, marks, or scars and the associated records for individuals that have those distinguishing marks. This can help law enforcement narrow searches based on these features.
www.newsroom.msu.edu/site/indexer/3407/content.htm

Computers Will Increase Ability to Enforce Law
Yuma Sun, (06/03/2008)

The Yuma County Sheriff's office, using unspecified Federal funding, is updating 50 patrol vehicles with new mobile data terminals (MDT). The computers will cost almost $200,000. To help reduce costs the department will use its own personnel to install and program the units. The MDTs being replaced allow the deputies to access motor vehicle records and
crime databases, but the new units will allow quicker access to photos, and deputies will be able to complete reports from the field versus returning to the station.
www.yumasun.com/opinion/ability_42108___article.html/computers_enforce.html

Sagem Morpho Wins Biometric Identification Technology Award
BusinessWire, (06/02/2008)

At the 2008 Global Border Security Conference, Sagem Morpho, Inc. demonstrated its biometrics identification tool MorphFace Investigate (MFI) system. The system includes case management capabilities, biometric matching, and
forensic evaluation tools to help with investigative tasks. It is capable of providing tools needed to match individuals where images are available via mug shot, motor vehicle records, or on a watch list using multiple type of source material.
www.businesswire.com/portal/site/google/?ndmViewId=news_view&newsId=20080602006252&newsLang=en

Purdue Professor Schools
Law Enforcement on Mac "Cyber Forensics"
ARS Technica, (06/03/2008), Chris Foresman

Purdue University's Director of Cyber Forensics, Dr. Marc Rogers, is providing officers from all over Indiana training on the forensics examination of Macintosh computers, iPods, and iPhones. The university's Cyber Forensics Lab, part of the College of
Technology's Department of Computer and Information Technology, supports not only the graduate Cyber Forensics program, but is also used for research and provides assistance and training to all levels of law enforcement. The lab hopes to continue providing forensic investigators with increased knowledge regarding Macintosh operating systems and published information about the examination of Apple products.
arstechnica.com/journals/apple.ars/2008/06/03/purdue-prof-schools-law-enforcement-on-mac-cyber-forensics

Law Enforcement - One-Stop Shopping for Tracking Criminals
The New York Times, (06/01/2008), Elsa Brenner

Space that was previously used by the Westchester County Department of Social Services as a homeless shelter is being repurposed as an information center to be used by
law enforcement for crime analysis. In an effort to promote information sharing at all levels, the new Westchester Intelligence Center will be used by the county's 43 agencies, and be shared with other multijurisdictional county, State, and Federal agencies that operate in the county. The cost to convert the space was $280,000.
www.nytimes.com/2008/06/01/nyregion/nyregionspecial2/01policewe.html?ref=nyregionspecial2

Texas City Uses Wireless IP Video for Crime Prevention Network
Security Products Online, (06/03/2008)

The city of Southlake, Texas, will become one more city to enlist the support of video surveillance on a wireless IP network as a
crime prevention tool. Southlake has an "old-style town square," and using this type of technology was ideal for not disrupting the look and feel of the town square with obtrusive equipment. BigWave Communications was chosen to install and provide the service for this project by the city.
www.secprodonline.com/articles/63571/

Web 2.0 Sites a Thriving Marketplace for Malware
The Washington Post, (05/31/2008), Erik Larkin - PC World

The creation and distribution of malware is not illegal in the United States or abroad, but the actual act of using the program or software is illegal. Keeping that in mind, creator/vendors of the programs are using the Internet to advertise and sell their products on social networking sites, blogs, and even YouTube. However, the publicity being generated flies in the face of the conventional wisdom of not attracting attention when doing something questionable. The sites that are being used by the groups to advertise do have the impact of giving the
law enforcement community a starting point for investigations and data gathering. Instances that involve the successful prosecution of vendors seem to be a rarity because proving the vendor had prior knowledge of criminal intent is very difficult.
www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/05/31/AR2008053100106.html

State Meth-Busters Get New Tool
Arkansas Democrat Gazette, (06/05/2008), Noel E. Oman

An electronic logbook called MethMonitor, created by LeadsOnLabs, is a new tool for the Arkansas
Crime Information Center. This tool allows agencies, with staff dedicated to methamphetamine investigations, access to records via computer that were previously only available in hard copy at pharmacies. This tool can save officers time in their efforts to build such cases. For pharmacies, participation costs nothing, and the system is user friendly to help ensure participation. Only active for a few weeks, the system is already making an impact by helping in meth cases.
www.nwanews.com/adg/News/227754/

Monday, June 09, 2008

War and Criminal Justice

June 9, 2008, (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added Lynn “Buck” Compton, an author who has served both in War and in our domestic criminal justice system.

Lieutenant
Lynn “Buck” Compton is familiar to many people because his service in World War Two was portrayed by actor Neal McDonough in the HBO miniseries Band of Brothers. But, what many don’t know is that Lynn Compton, after World War Two, was also a Los Angeles Police Department Detective, an Assistant District Attorney; appellate judge and author.

In 1939,
Lynn “Buck” Compton attended UCLA where he majored in physical education. At UCLA, he lettered two years in football and three years in baseball and was captain of the baseball team. Notably, Compton played guard on the Rose Bowl team in 1943. During his college days he was also a member of the ROTC program.

Lynn “Buck” Compton graduated from the school’s ROTC program and was commissioned as a second lieutenant. He commanded the “second platoon of Easy Company in the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, part of the 101st Airborne Division. He parachuted into Normandy during the early hours of D-Day, was part of the assault group that destroyed the German artillery during the battle at Brecourt Manor, fought on the line at Carentan, helped liberate Holland during Operation Market Garden, and fought in the freezing cold of the Battle of Bastogne.

As a combat veteran, Lt. Compton received the Silver Star, for valor in the face of the enemy, the Purple Heart, for being wounded while in the U.S.
military, the World War Two Victory Medal, for active duty during World War Two, the Orange Lanyard of the Royal Netherlands Army, for bravery, leadership and loyalty in the defense of the Netherlands, the Combat Infantry Badge, the American Campaign Citation, the American Defense Medal, and the European, African Mid-Eastern Campaign Medal. Compton, along with his unit, was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation for extraordinary heroism against an armed enemy when holding the main line of resistance during the Battle of the Bulge.”

After war,
Lynn “Buck” Compton, joined the Los Angeles Police Department and began to attend Loyola Law School. During his days with the Los Angeles Police Department, he attainted the rank of detective and was assigned to the Central Burglary Division. In 1951, Lynn Compton left the Los Angeles Police Department and joined the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office as a prosecutor.

During his career with the District Attorney’s Office, Lynn Compton would rise to the position of Chief Deputy and serve as the second in command of the District Attorney’s Office. He prosecuted all manner of felony cases as well as high profile cases such the prosecution of Sirhan Sirhan for the murder of Robert F. Kennedy. In 1970,
Lynn “Buck” Compton was “appointed by Governor Ronald Reagan to the California Courts of Appeal as an Associate Justice. During his term on the bench, Judge Compton authored more than 2,000 written opinions in all areas of law.” Lynn “Buck” Compton is the author of Call of Duty: My Life Before, During and After the Band of Brothers.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 1021
police officers (representing 429 police departments) and their 2175 criminal justice books in 33 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books. Finally, because of his service, Lynn “Buck” Compton was added to Military-Writers.com as well as LAPDAuthors.com.

Saturday, June 07, 2008

NYPD Emergency Services Unit

June 5, 2008, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) On June 11, 2008, Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole will feature an interview with Retired NYPD Detective and former member of the NYPD Emergency Services Unit, Alan Sheppard.

Program Date: June 11, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic:
NYPD Emergency Services Unit
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/06/12/The-Watering-Hole

About the Guest
In the late 1960s, Detective
Alan Sheppard, NYPD (ret.), served two years with the United States Army. His service included deployment with the 101st Airborne Division to the Republic of South Vietnam. In 1969, Alan Sheppard joined the New York City Police Department. His first assignment was as a patrol officer in the 81st Precinct which is located in the north central area of the borough of Brooklyn. This neighborhood is known as "Bedford Stuyvesant." A small section along the southern border is referred to Stuyvesant Heights.

In 1974,
Alan Sheppard was assigned the Emergency Service Unit. The Emergency Services Unit of the NYPD is nation’s largest permanent emergency response team with over 400 personnel. The “ESU” provides specialized equipment, expertise and support; “from auto accidents to building collapses to hostage situations, ESU officers are called on when the situation requires advanced equipment and expertise.” In 1985, Alan Sheppard was assigned to the NYPD Intelligence Division and given dual status with the United States Marshals. In 1988, he worked an undercover assignment and in 1989 he was assigned to the Major Case Squad. Detective Alan Sheppard, NYPD (ret.) is the author of E-Man: Life in the NYPD Emergency Services Unit.

According to Lieutenant
Vernon Gebreth, NYPD (ret.), “Sheppard served in the NYPD during the urban warfare years and received his Baptism of Fire at the Williamsburg Siege. He was a decorated hero of the NYPD and member of the elite Emergency Services Unit (ESU). In his book, E-Man Al takes the reader on a non-stop roller coaster ride of emotions as he reveals life on the streets through the eyes of a combatant during the turbulent times and the work of the Emergency Services Unit—the same unit that the Police call when they need Help.”

According to one reader,
Alan Sheppard’s book, “is a fast paced account of a true story about a cop who not only carried people from burning buildings and off of bridges high above the waters of NYC but also saved a fellow cop from sure death by shooting his killer dead. You will not be able to put this book down! I urge to read how some people don't imagine how to be a hero but actually become one.”

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant
Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530