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Wednesday, April 30, 2008

First Offender Prostitution Program

The First Offender Prostitution Program (FOPP) is designed to reduce the demand for
commercial sex and human trafficking in San Francisco by educating men arrested for soliciting prostitutes (or “johns”) about the negative consequences of prostitution. The program is a partnership of the San Francisco District Attorney’s office (SFDA), the
San Francisco Police Department (SFPD), and a local nonprofit organization, Standing Against Global Exploitation (SAGE). Eligible arrestees are given the choice of paying a fee and attending a one-day class (known generically as the “john school”), or being prosecuted. Fees support all of the costs of conducting the john school classes, as well as subsidizing police vice operations, screening and processing arrestees, and recovery programs for women and girls involved in commercial sex.

The evaluation described in this report addresses three priority issues: the effectiveness, return on investment, and transferability of the FOPP. Data collection efforts included site visits,
police “ride alongs,” interviews, collection of program documents and administrative data, structured observations of john school classes, pre- and post-class surveys of participants, and assembly of criminal history data regarding men arrested for soliciting prostitutes in San Francisco and throughout California.

READ ON
http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/222451.pdf

Tuesday, April 29, 2008

PaCom Helps Establish Transnational Crime Unit in Micronesia

By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

April 29, 2008 - A new transnational
crime unit U.S. Pacific Command is helping to establish in Micronesia will support a multinational crackdown on drug trafficking and other crimes that have the potential to destabilize the region, a senior military official said yesterday. The Micronesia Regional Transnational Unit opened April 23 in Pohnpei, Micronesia, to promote information sharing critical to stemming the flow of drugs, particularly methamphetamines, throughout Asia and the Pacific, Navy Rear Adm. Paul F. Zukunft, commander of Joint Interagency Task Force West, told American Forces Press Service.

JIATF West, U.S. Pacific Command's element focused on drug-related threats in the region, provided $460,000 to refurbish a 10,000-square-foot facility and equip it with communications and
computer equipment, Zukunft said.

The task force also is training operators at the new facility "to, in simplistic terms, connect the dots to look at emerging trends," Zukunft said. The Australian National Police will provide a full-time mentor to support the unit for the first year.

Operators in the unit represent not just the Federated States of Micronesia, but also the Republic of the Marshall Islands, Kiribati, the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands, and Palau. "So this unit is really transnational in its composition," Zukunft said.

The unit is the sixth in the region, all linked to the Australian Federal
Police's Pacific Transnational Crime Coordination Center in Samoa. Other units are in Fiji, Samoa, Tonga, Vanuatu and Papua New Guinea.

Intelligence gathered through the new unit will support Micronesia's three patrol boats, provided through Australia's Pacific Patrol Boat Program to monitor against ocean-borne threats. "Absent acute information, it is very cost-ineffective to just send those patrol boats out at random without any advance knowledge of where the threats might exist in the ocean," Zukunft said. "Information is key."

Collectively, the network of facilities will build a more proactive
criminal intelligence and investigative presence in the Pacific that's critical in light of criminal elements who operate across borders, Zukunft said.

"What we are trying to do is support a network that will support the multinational sharing of information, since a lot of these transnational
crime activities are truly global enterprises," he said. In addition, many have nearly unlimited resources, which he said "puts law enforcement, obviously, at an extreme disadvantage."

Zukunft cited a strong correlation between areas with high drug-interdiction rates and those with strong information-sharing protocols that bolster
law enforcement capability.

This, in turn, supports good governance that discourages transnational criminals.

"The bad guys typically will look for paths of least resistance, where rule of law is weak," Zukunft said. "It is an opportunity for them to exploit, ... and that's what we are working to prevent."

JIATF West has been supporting the U.S. counterdrug effort since 1989, when it was established as Joint Task Force 5 with headquarters in Alameda, Calif. It was redesignated JIATF West in 1994, then moved four years ago to Camp H.M. Smith, Hawaii.

There, it is collocated with the PaCom headquarters and focuses on drug-related threats in Asia and the Pacific.

Monday, April 28, 2008

Rawls, Barlow and Bartlett

April 23, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three law enforcement officials from Florida.

Neal Rawls was a sergeant with the Delray Police Department (Florida). Neal Rawls received 14 commendations, led a tactical unit for in-progress crimes, was civil defense liaison for his department, and Public Information Officer. Additionally, Neal Rawls was an instructor at the Palm Beach County Police Academy and Palm Beach Community College, teaching firearms; pursuit and defensive driving; surveillance; arrest, search and seizure; and the use of personal defensive weapons.

Neal Rawls holds a BA in criminology and a Master's Criminal Justice. In 1981, Neal Rawls went into private industry as a personal bodyguard for a corporate executive. He was promoted to director of security for the corporation, charged with designing and developing security protocols for company offices worldwide. Neal Rawls is the author of Be Alert, Be Aware, Have a Plan: The Complete Guide to Personal Security.

David Barlow began his criminal justice career as a correctional officer in South Carolina. In 1981, he became a deputy sheriff for the Richland County Sheriff’s Department (South Carolina). In 1983, he joined the Florida State University Police Department as a Law Enforcement Officer I. In 1987, David Barlow left the practitioner side of the field and began to pursue an academic career, beginning as a instructor of criminal justice at the South Carolina State College. Today, he is a professor and dean, College of Basic and Applied Sciences, Fayetteville State University.

David Barlow has a BS in the Administration of Justice and Sociology, an MS in Criminology and a Ph.D. in Criminology and Criminal Justice. David Barlow is the co-author of Police in America: Classic and Contemporary Readings, Police in a Multicultural Society: An American Story, and Classics in Policing.

Derrick Bartlett is a sniper and trainer on the Fort Lauderdale Police Department SWAT Team. He has been a police officer for over twenty-five years. Twenty-two of those years he has been assigned to special operations teams. He is also the Managing Director of Snipercraft, Inc., which is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the education and enhancement to police sniper skills. He has held sniper seminars and schools for more than 500 police agencies nationwide. Derrick Bartlett is the author of Snipercraft: The Art of Police Sniping and Staring at the Crosshairs.

Richard Morey, Coordinator,
Law Enforcement Programs, SFCC Criminal Justice Academy said of Staring at the Crosshairs, “Derrick’s contributions prove how one person can make a difference. He has made a difference, and, perhaps more importantly, he has instilled in others the desire to make a difference. He is passionate about training, and it shows in his teaching, and through his guidance. Today, snipers are a stronger community because of people like Derrick Bartlett. Derrick has put the word “sniper” back in our job description, and we can be proud.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 990 police officers (representing 415 police departments) and their 2096
police books in 35 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Leadership Book Garner’s more Praise

San Dimas, (CA) April 27, 2008, Leadership: Texas Hold ‘em Style, a recent finalist for the Eric Hoffer Book Awards, continues to receive praise from readers.

Andrew Borello, a reader noted on Amazon.com, “Wow...what a great book. As a consultant for career development and promotion, I read all the leadership materials I can get my hands on. The problem is, much of it is disappointing. It's too long; too theoretical; too convoluted; or just plain boring. Harvey & Foster created a leadership encyclopedia of sorts that is packed with the essentials of leadership. This book has all the basics: Delegation, Decision Making, Teamwork, and many more, but it also has valuable details on important elements of leadership that other books often overlook: Consistency (important), Accountability (one of the biggest problems with new generation employees), and How to fail. This book is well written and detailed, but concise in that it won't overwhelm the reader. It weaves the information through stories, definitions that are right on the money, great quotes, simple diagrams, and nice-to-know parallel information. This book serves as a great resource and will always be at an arm's reach for years to come.”

About the Book
Using card playing as analogy for
leadership, Captain Andrew Harvey, CPD (ret.), Ed.D. and Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA found the right mix of practical experience and academic credentials to write a definitive book for leaders. Working together, Harvey and Foster have written Leadership: Texas Hold em Style. Most often leaders find they are given a set of resources people, equipment, funds, experience and a mission. As Foster noted, "You're dealt a certain hand. How you play that hand as a leader determines your success."

About the Authors
Andrew Harvey served in law enforcement for 25 years, the last 12 as a captain with a Southern California police agency. He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Cal State Los Angeles, and an educational doctorate in the field of organizational leadership from Pepperdine University. He is a graduate of the FBI National Academy, the California POST Command College, the West Point Leadership Program, and is recognized in California as a master instructor.

Dr.
Andrew Harvey is an experienced college educator, currently serving as a professor at the University of Phoenix, and as a faculty advisor at the Union Institute and University. He has been published numerous times in national and international publications. He is a recognized expert in leadership and career development, and has served as an instructor in command leadership at the Los Angeles Police Department Academy.

Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton. He is has concluded the course work for his doctorate. Raymond is a graduate of the West Point Leadership program and has attended law enforcement, technology and leadership programs such as the National Institute for Justice, Technology Institute, Washington, DC.

Raymond is currently a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in
law enforcement, public policy, technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. His first book, “Police Technology (Prentice Hall, July 2004)” is used in over 100 colleges and universities nationwide.

More Information:
www.pokerleadership.com

Wednesday, April 23, 2008

Special Agent James O. Born

April 22, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) The April 23, 2008, program of Conversations with Cops at The Watering Hole features a conversation with special agent and author James O. Born.

Program Date: April 23, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: A conversation with
James Born
Listen Live: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

About the Guest
James Born is a Special Agent with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. He has been involved in investigations such as organized crime, violent crimes, economic crimes, drug cartels, and police corruption.

Before working with the
Florida Department of Law Enforcement, James Born joined the US Marshals service in early 1986 as a deputy marshal. One year later, he transferred to the Drug Enforcement Administration. In four years with Drug Enforcement Administration, he was assigned to the West Palm Beach field office, and traveled within the United States and Panama. He spent a great deal of time in Miami during the height of the drug wars. His investigations at Drug Enforcement Administration generally focused on cocaine smuggling from Colombia. In addition, he worked undercover in a number of situations, in one case volunteering to assist the ATF as an undercover agent in the Ku Klux Klan during an explosives investigation.

James Born writes fictional novels set in Florida. According to one reader, “It's always exciting to pick up a novel by an author who started off with great work and who keeps getting better with each new book. Born fits that description. Escape Clause, his third novel featuring Florida Department of Law Enforcement agent Bill Tasker, is easily his best, not an easy mark to reach considering the high quality of Walking Money and Shock Wave, his first two novels.” James Born’s fourth novel is Field of Fire.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant
Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant
Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Tuesday, April 22, 2008

From Iwo Jima to Computer Crime

April 21, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three police officers who have written a variety of works, from a personal account of the Battle of Iwo Jima to a text on investigating computer crime.

Alfred Stone left his home in Marlin (Texas) as a teenager to join the U.S. Marines during World War II. As a member of the Fifth Marine Division, he participated in the Battle of Iwo Jima and after served with the occupying forces in Japan. He was called back to duty during the Korean conflict. Alfred Stone’s 38 year law enforcement career included service as a highway patrol officer and other service with the Texas Department of Public Safety. Alfred Stone is the author of The Investigating of Crimes: An introduction and A Marine Remembers Iwo Jima: Dog Company, 2nd Battalion, 27th Marines, Fifth Marine Division; and, a co-author of Strategies for Community Policing.

According to a reader of A Marine Remembers Iwo Jima: Dog Company, 2nd Battalion, 27th Marines, Fifth Marine Division, “This is an outstanding transcript of one Marines personal account of the many men who fought on IWO JIMA. The author more importantly wishes the reader to draw their on conclusions from these personal accounts. The history of these events is depicted in the most accurate rendition, more importantly the writer wants the reader to understand these events as they unfold from that standpoint.”

Michael Knetzger is a fourteen-year law enforcement veteran and currently a Lieutenant with the Green Bay Police Department (Wisconsin). Michael Knetzger began his law enforcement career as a patrol officer and detective for the Town of Brookfield Police Department. He is a certified State of Wisconsin Technical College Instructor and teaches criminal justice courses at Northeast Wisconsin Technical College, Colorado Technical University Online and ITT Technical Institute. Michael Knetzger has successfully completed the International Association of Computer Investigative Specialists forensic examiner program, Basic Data Recovery & Analysis course, and several other courses and seminars on investigating internet crimes. He is also a certified tactical instructor and teaches defensive and arrest tactics, firearms, and professional communications skills courses to new law enforcement recruits. Michael Knetzger has a BA in Justice and Public Policy and a Masters in Public Administration. He is the co-author of True Crime in Titletown, USA: Cold Cases and Investigating High-Tech Crime.

Jeremy Muraski is an eight-year law enforcement veteran and currently an Advanced Patrol Officer, Webmaster and Field Training Officer with the Green Bay Police Department. He has worked as a Network Administrator for Kimberly Clark Corporation and at various jobs as a Computer Support Engineer and Help Desk Specialist supporting online investors for Fidelity Investments. Jeremy Muraski is certified to teach for The Wisconsin Technical College System and teaches criminal justice courses at Northeast Wisconsin Technical College, including Investigating High Tech Crimes, and Juvenile Law.

Jeremy Muraski has completed AccessData's Forensic Toolkit Course, the National White Collar Crime Center's Basic Data Recovery & Analysis (BDRA) course, and several other courses and seminars on investigating Internet crimes. In addition to having developed college level course work in computer crime, he holds a number of computer certifications such as Microsoft Access Database Design and Administration and Website Design and Computer Network Administration. Jeremy Muraski is a co-author of Investigating High-Tech Crime.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 981
police officers (representing 411 police departments) and their 2079 police books in 35 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Monday, April 21, 2008

Squint, Gilbreath and Sweatt

April 16, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three Texas law enforcement officials.

Dale Squint entered the US Army in 1956 and served a three year enlistment which included duty Japan and Korea. In 1960, he began his law enforcement career with the El Paso Police Department. Dale Squint worked uniform patrol for approximately four years and then was promoted to detective. In 1967, he joined the Texas Department of Public Safety and served in the Highway Patrol until 1970. Dale Squint joined the Border Patrol in 1970, serving out the remained of his law enforcement career. Dale Squint is the author of My Border Patrol Diary: Laredo, Texas.

After serving in the United States military,
West Gilbreath joined the Dona Ana County Sheriff's Department in Las Cruces, New Mexico. On February 1, 2001, West Gilbreath retired as the Lieutenant of the Criminal Investigations Division to start a second career. He and his family relocated to Denton, Texas where he is a criminal investigator for the University of North Texas Police Department. West Gilbreath is a graduate of the FBI National Academy, and received a Heritage Award for preserving the history of the Dona Ana County Sheriff's Department through the creation of the Historical Museum of Lawmen. West Gilbreath is the author of Death on the Gallows: The Story of Legal Hangings in New Mexico, 1847-1923.

John Sweatt is a technical associate with ATA Associates, Inc. A retired, twenty-two-year veteran of the Houston Police Department, he worked extensively in the hit and run accident detail and accident investigation division. He received his BS in 1978 from the University of Houston and has continued to develop expertise in advanced accident reconstruction, radial tire belt separations, restraint systems examinations, truck brake failure analysis, vehicle damage analysis, ground base aerial crush photography, airbag technology and development, and tractor-trailer rollovers and underride accidents.

John Sweatt’s areas of specialized expertise include: accident investigations, accident reconstruction, and commercial vehicle investigations and reconstruction. He is a licensed private investigator in the state of Texas and is HAZWOPER certified. John B. Sweatt is the co-author of Handbook of Charts and Tables for Vehicle Dynamic Analysis.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 975 police officers (representing 409 police departments) and their 2068
criminal justice books in 35 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Wednesday, April 16, 2008

Public Safety Technology in the News

Online Missing Persons System Unveiled
The Daily Gazette, (04/07/2008), Carl Scribner

In conjunction with the seventh annual New York State Missing Persons Day, specialists from the University of North Texas, Center for Human Identification, gave a presentation on the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUS) database. The system, operated by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), will be available in 2009 and will act as a central warehouse of records on unidentified remains and missing person reports. System data will be searched for any possible matches. The system will also use
DNA, gathered from a family member, as a part of the identification process. NIJ plans to provide sample collection kits, requiring a swab inside the mouth of a family member, to family members free of charge. The public can log on to www.namus.gov to view and tour the site and preview the records currently on the system.
www.dailygazette.com/news/2008/apr/07/0407_database/

FBI Unveils N-DEx Rollout
Government Computer News, (04/02/2008), Wilson P. Dizard III

The first increment of the National Data Exchange (N-Dex) Network System has been launched. N-Dex is sponsored by the FBI's
Criminal Justice Information Division. This first increment will allow 50,000 users access to a system that provides Federal, State, tribal, and local law enforcement with the ability to share information that is presently housed in individual agency data systems. Working with law enforcement nationwide, the FBI and Raytheon established the needs of the users and implemented these capabilities in the N-Dex system, which is scheduled for incremental release over the next 3 years. Raytheon indicates that the system will eventually support 200,000 investigators from about 18,000 agencies across Federal, State, tribal, and local jurisdictions.
www.gcn.com/online/vol1_no1/46052-1.html

Internet Scams Cost Consumers $240M
The Mercury News, (04/06/2008), Christine Simmons

The number of reported Internet scams was down last year in comparison to past years, but the dollar amount lost was up by $40 million, to a new high of $240 million, according to a government report that used data gathered from the
Internet Crime Complaint Center. Other statistics from the report indicate an increase in ploys that involved pets, check cashing, and online dating. Furthermore, the amount lost by males was on average higher than females, and the overall amount lost increased with age.
www.mercurynews.com/nationworld/ci_8829968

Electronic Ticketing System Puts
Police in the Fast Lane
Journal & Courier, (04/02/2008), Dorothy Schneider

Indiana State
Police in West Lafayette adopted the use of e-ticketing earlier this year, which allows officers to scan licenses, capture images, and print citations from their cruiser. Once they find funding, other local departments hope to tap into the technology to support the purchase and use of such a system. The system has reduced the amount of time spent by officers issuing citations and warning by about half.
www.jconline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080402/NEWS/804020334

Kansas City Crime Lab Gets New Technology
KCTV Kansas City, (04/03/2008)

The
Kansas City (Missouri) Crime Lab has received U.S. Department of Justice funding to help with investigating crimes in the city. One grant has helped the lab hire a full-time network caseworker to handle investigations that involve shell casing evidence. These casing can be checked against the National Ballistics Information Network. The second grant has helped the city purchase two new DNA robots that are capable of collecting and analyzing DNA evidence efficiently.
www.kctv5.com/news/15787833/detail.html

DNA Project Proves Effective in Case of Missing Stewartville Teenager
Post-Bulletin, (04/04/2008), Janice Gregorson

The year-old Minnesota Bureau of
Criminal Apprehension's Missing Persons DNA Project, designed to assist with identifying matches between missing people and unidentified remains, registered its first successful match between a missing teen and year old remains found in Florida. The process relies on DNA fingerprinting to make the matches. This project allows the family of a missing person to obtain closure, while assisting individual departments in solving cases and using resources effectively.
www.postbulletin.com/newsmanager/templates/localnews_story.asp?z=2&a=335852

Old Room, New Purpose
MonroeNews.com, (04/04/2008)

Monroe County (Michigan) Sheriff Tilman Crutchfield is repurposing the vacant central dispatch room and creating a secure
crime lab for his new crime unit. Since the department has investigators trained in the field of forensic computer examination, the department felt that the empty space would give investigators the space necessary to perform their tasks. Although the most prevalent computer crimes are those involving sexual predators, computer crime expands beyond that area. For example, one case being investigated by the unit began online with words and threats, but escalated to an actual physical assault. The creation of this unit signals a shift toward fighting crime of a specialized nature.
www.monroenews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080404/NEWS01/506322489/-1/NEWS

The Value of Video System Allows Inmates to Appear in Court Without Ever Leaving Jail
The Eagle-Tribune, James A. Kimble

The installation and use of video conferencing in the Rockingham County (New Hampshire) Superior Court is the subject of debate. Prosecutors and jail officials believe it is needed from a cost savings and improved security standpoint. However, superior court officials see it as useless and costly. Rockingham County jail spends $275 a month on its system, which is wired with district courts in Salem and Portsmouth. Because of the belief in the effectiveness of the system, the Portsmouth District Court was brought onboard using $20,000 in funding from the jails budget. With the rise in the cost of gas and the amount of time needed to transport prisoners, jail officials and county attorneys feel the savings to the county would be significant, especially for those court appearances that are mandatory, but brief in nature. The superior court did have a system in place in 2001; however, the system was only in one court room, and setting up the system and shuttling judges from o! ne court to another was not timely or efficient. For these reasons the system was not used effectively, and was eventually dropped. However, because of changes in costs to support the system, rising gas costs, and the added
security the system would provide, prosecutors and jail officials feel it is time to reevaluate the technology's use in the superior court.
www.eagletribune.com/punewsnh/local_story_096213634.html?keyword=secondarystory

Firearms Training Simulator Gives Police Recruits Experience With Guns in Tough Situations
Daily Freeman, (04/14/2008), Kyle Wind

Using a simulator purchased by Ulster County Community College, the Ulster County (New York)
police academy trains officers and recruits on how to handle tough situations. The scenarios on the system are taken from 500 to 600 real-life situations from throughout the country. System equipment includes a retrofitted 9mm Glock pistol that is connected to the computer, and the computer projects the scenario to a wall or screen. Because the system is connected to the weapon, it can track the officer's shots, as well as muzzle location. This is useful when demonstrating to recruits exact muzzle location during a situation and the concept of muzzle drift. The scenarios also help to improve the trainees' powers of observation, but most importantly they learn in the controlled chaos of the simulation, when it is okay to make mistakes in order to learn. Future features of the system will allow officers the chance to train using less-than-lethal alternatives.
www.dailyfreeman.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=19481099&BRD=1769&PAG=461&dept_id=74969&rfi=6

Lynchburg Police Disappointed Over Silent Partner Alert System Response
The News & Advance, (04/01/2008), Carrie Sidener

Five hundred citizens have signed up to participate in the Silent Partner Alert system implemented by the Lynchburg
Police Department 2 years ago, as opposed to the thousands that the department believed would sign up. The system provides the department with the ability to send mass e-mail messages to subscribers with information about anything from robberies and car crashes on major roads to missing person alerts. The messages can be sent to PDAs, computers, Blackberries, cell phones, or other devices capable of receiving e-mail. Because of the speed with which these alerts can be sent, they can help police solve a crime. Lynchburg was the second department to sign up for the service; currently seven departments in Virginia participate.
www.newsadvance.com/lna/news/local/article/lynchburg_police_disappointed_over_silent_partner_alert_system_response/3831/

Threats Go High-Tech
The Herald, (04/13/2008), Julia Reynolds

The new canvas for threatening gang graffiti is proving to be hard for
police to patrol. Gangs are using the Internet, and specifically sites like YouTube. Police can pull a video from the site quickly if it is identified as a violation of policy. However, for police to act on these threats, the act must "cause victims to fear for their safety," according to Monterey County Deputy Assistant District Attorney Terry Spitz. Another issue is lack of enough resources for police to patrol not only sites like YouTube, but the Web as a whole. Salinas (California) police have a unit of computer forensic investigators that can work on such threats, but unit staff must also handle homicides or other major crime. If during the course of an investigation the threats seem credible, staff notify the victim, but this action is not required by law. These postings can, however, be used by detectives to gather information about local gangs, or as evidence should a crime occur.
origin1.montereyherald.com/news/ci_8909961?nclick_check=1

Tuesday, April 15, 2008

Texas Lawmen and Women

April 14, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added one female and two male law enforcement officials from Texas.

Laurie Moore received her police commission in 1979, in Austin. She worked police patrol, criminal investigations, and was promoted to Sergeant in 1985. After 1985 until 1992, she worked as a DA investigator as a Sergeant Investigator, and later, Chief Investigator for several District Attorneys in the Central Texas area. In 1992, Laurie Moore moved to Fort Worth to attend law school, and retained her peace officer’s license as a Reserve Deputy for the Tarrant County Constables. She is still a licensed, commissioned peace officer, and runs a solo law practice in Fort Worth’s Cultural District.

Laurie Moore earned her Bachelor of Arts Degree from the University of Texas at Austin. She pursued further post-graduate studies in Criminal Justice at Southwest Texas State University in San Marcos, earned her Juris Doctor from Texas Wesleyan University School of Law, and is licensed to practice law in the State of Texas, as well as all Federal Courts. Laurie Moore is the author of The Wild Orchid Society, The Lady Godiva Murder, Constable’s Run, Constable’s Apprehension, Constable’s Wedding, and, Simmering Secrets of Weeping Mary.

According to the book description go of Constable's Apprehension, “Reserve Deputy Constable Raven returns in this page-turning sequel to the critically acclaimed Constable's Run. This time, Raven's got more problems than just a cheating boyfriend.”

Glenn Elliott is a retired Texas Ranger. According to Paul Harvey, “I don’t know what you know about the Texas Rangers but they are an elite corps of lawmen. Respected at all levels of law enforcement and revered in their home state. And, if you had to pick on to represent the best of the best, that one would be Ranger Glenn Elliot.” Ranger Glenn Elliot is the co-author of Glenn Elliott: A Ranger's Ranger.

In June of 1875,
James Gillett joined the Texas Rangers. Around 1881, he became a Deputy Marshal for the City of El Paso. He resigned as Marshal in 1885. He became a rancher and at some point was elected for a two-year term as sheriff of Brewster County. James Gillett is the author of Six Years with the Texas Rangers: 1875-1881.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 969 police officers (representing 408
police departments) and their 2062 criminal justice books in 35 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Monday, April 14, 2008

Foxjohn, Munson and Kuboviak

April 13, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books.

John Foxjohn has investigated more than 300 homicides during his ten years in law enforcement. Born and raised in Nacogdoches in East Texas, John Foxjohn quit high school and joined the U.S. Army, spending six years as a Ranger in Vietnam and Germany, and becoming one of the youngest sergeants in the Army, at that time. After his military service, John FoxJohn returned to Texas and joined the Nacogdoches Police Department. Later, he became a member of the Houston Police Department.

Upon leaving
law enforcement, John Foxjohn attended Stephen F. Austin State University, received a degree in history, and began another career teaching and coaching. He retired from teaching in 2003 and is a full time writer. John FoxJohn is the author of Cold Tears; Journey of the Spirit; and, Code of Deceit.

According to the book description of Cold Tears, “A veteran Houston homicide detective's unfortunate mistake causes a woman's death. When a woman shoots David Mason he returns fire, killing her, but he can't escape her accusing eyes. Beth Porter, David's fiancĂ©e, already feared his dangerous job, and when he's wounded the fear escalates and she separates from him. His mistake that threatens his career now endangers the relationship with the love of his life.”

Charlie Munson was a deputy sheriff with the Lavaca County Sheriff’s Department at the beginning of the 20th Century. He is the author of Mister Charlie: Memoir of a Texas Lawman, 1902-1910.

Jim Kuboviak began his career in criminal justice in 1969 as a police officer for the Sam Houston State University Police Department (Texas). Jim Kuboviak graduated with a BS in Criminal Justice in 1972; he earned two master's degrees; and two doctorates. Since 1985, Jim Kuboviak has served as the County Attorney for Brazos County (Texas). Jim Kuboviak is the author of Legal and Procedural Application of Mobile Videotaping to Criminal Interdiction and DWI Mobile Videotaping for Police and Prosecutors: Policy, Procedures, and Law.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 963 police officers (representing 405 police departments) and their 2050
law enforcement books in 35 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Sunday, April 13, 2008

Texas Lawmen

April 12, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three law enforcement officials from the State of Texas

Ted Hinton became a Dallas County Sheriff’s Department deputy sheriff in 1932. He was a member of the posse that confronted and killed the infamous Bonnie and Clyde. Ted Hinton left the Dallas County Sheriff’s Department in 1941. A pilot, Ted Hinton gave flying instruction to Army Air Corps recruits throughout World War II. After the war, he opened restaurant and passed away in 1982. Ted Hinton is the author of Ambush: The Real Story of Bonnie and Clyde.

According to one reader, Ambush: The Real Story of Bonnie and Clyde, it “is
Ted Hinton's account describing the early years and the facts leading up to the bloody end of two desperate criminals. Hinton speaks out as one of the six men who killed Bonnie and Clyde in a hailstorm of bullets without warning on the morning of May 23, 1934 near Gibsland, Louisiana. This book is well illustrated and provides several rare pictures. I recommend this book to readers.”

Captain
James Howell has been in law enforcement for over 30 years and is the Commander of the Dallas County Sheriff’s Department Criminal Investigations Division. James Howell is the author of Copper Eyes and the co-author of Emerald Reflections.

According to the book description of Copper Eyes, “Danielle Ramos is a new Dallas County deputy sheriff who recently left the El Paso Sheriff’s Department to move forward with her life following her divorce. The detective’s first murder case in Dallas County thrusts her into the world of a past serial killer who had decided that after twelve years, now is the time to start killing again. Danielle is merely in the way.”

Chief
Reece Daniel began his law enforcement career in 1976 with the Paris Police Department (Texas). He joined the Farmers Branch Police Department in 1980, rising to the rank of Captain. In 1999, he became the chief of police for the Rowlett Police Department; and, in 2006 he became the chief of police for the Jacksonville Police Department (Texas).

Chief
Reece Daniel has a AA in law enforcement; a BS in Criminology and Psychology; and, a MS in Criminal Justice. He is a graduate of the FBI National Academy and holds a Criminal Justice Practitioner’s Certificate from the University of Virginia. Chief Reece Daniel is the author of Desert Sunshine.

According to the book description of Desert Sunshine, it “combines elements of modern law enforcement with the Old West of 1882. Ed Adair, retired police chief, moves back to his boyhood home in Arizona to become a Special Arizona Ranger, where he can indulge his insatiable appetite for western memorabilia and unsolved cases from the 1880s.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 957 police officers (representing 403 police departments) and their 2037
law enforcement books in 35 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Saturday, April 12, 2008

Texas Police Books

April 11, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three law enforcement officials from Texas.

Ron Delord was a patrol officer for the Beaumont Police Department (Texas) from 1969 to 1972. He served as a patrol officer and detective for the Mesquite Police Department (Texas) from 1972 to 1977. In 1977, Ron Delord was one of the founders of the Combined Law Enforcement Associations of Texas (CLEAT) and was elected its first president. He served nine three year terms. Ron Delord has a BA in Government, MA in Police Science and Administration and a JD. He has been a licensed attorney in Texas since 1987. Ron Delord is the co-author of Police Power, Politics and Confrontation: A Guide for the Successful Police Labor Leader.

Mark Stallo has served as a Dallas Police Department police officer for more than 24 years. He is currently a sergeant and has supervised the Crime Analysis Team for 13 years. Mark Stallo one of the founders the International Association of Crime Analysts (IACA). He served as Vice President of Membership for the IACA from 1991 to 1994, and as President from 1994 to 2000. As the current Past President, he counsels and advises the IACA Board. He has received training in a number of areas related to crime analysis, crime mapping, and various computer software. Mark Stall has a BS in Criminal Justice, an MS in Management and Administrative Science, and an MPA.

Mark Stallo is the author of Using Microsoft Office to Improve Law Enforcement Operations: Crime Analysis, Community Policing, and Investigations. Mark Stallo is the co-author of Using Geographic Information Systems in Law Enforcement: Crime Analysis and Community Policing : Using ArcView 3.X; Contemporary Issues, Applications, and Techniques in Crime Analysis; Better Policing With Microsoft Office: Crime Analysis Investigations; and, Crime and Punishment in the Lone Star State.

According to the book description of Using Microsoft Office to Improve Law Enforcement Operations:
Crime Analysis, Community Policing, and Investigations, “This book demonstrates how to use Access, Excel, Word and PowerPoint to become more effective and efficient in law enforcement applications. The examples presented in this book concentrate on crime analysis, community policing and investigative data. The exercises solve real world problems in law enforcement, using fictional data. The book has been designed for a 40 hour seminar or a semester long college course.”

Michael Thomas was a Dallas Police Department police officer for 30 years. He spent more than a third of his career assigned as a vice detective. Michael Thomas is the author of Vice Grip, Trackdown and Karen’s Boys. According to the book description of Karen’s Boys, “In a menopausal stew, forty-five year-old Karen Harmon figures she's reached the step where men aren't a necessary ingredient in the recipe of her life. Long years of service in the male dominated Dallas Police Department, and the police work itself, have left her with no desire for any male, boy or man. Fate, however, stirs her into an intriguing Vice Division investigation where not one, not two, but three males are added to the mix of her life.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 954
police officers (representing 401 police departments) and their 2033 police books in 35 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Friday, April 11, 2008

Field Training Officer Programs

April 11, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) The April 16, 2008, program of Conversations with Cops at The Watering Hole focuses on Field Training Officer programs with Dr. Dorothy McCoy.

Program Date: April 16, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Field Training Officer Programs
Guests: Dr.
Dorothy McCoy
Listen Live: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

About the Guest

Dr.
Dorothy McCoy was a lead instructor in the Master Instructor Program of the South Carolina Criminal Justice Academy. She has a Doctorate in Counseling Psychology and is an accomplished therapist with a background encompassing counseling and crisis work, teaching, and writing. Dr. Dorothy McCoy is a long-time consultant to law enforcement agencies on pre-employment evaluations, group crisis invention, and trauma recovery. Moreover, Dr. Dorothy McCoy is a Diplomate with the American Academy of Experts in Traumatic Stress; a Certified Cognitive-Behavioral Therapist; a National Certified Therapist; and, Nova-trained Community Crisis Responder. Additionally,
Dr.
Dorothy McCoy is a South Carolina State Constable.

Dr.
Dorothy McCoy is the author of three books: The Ultimate Book Of Personality Tests: Personality Tests For Enjoyment, Entertainment And Self-Discovery; From Shyness to Social Butterfly; and, The Manipulative Man: Identify His Behavior, Counter the Abuse, Regain Control.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant
Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant
Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Monday, April 07, 2008

397 Police Departments

April 7, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. With the addition of three law enforcement officials, the website now listed 948 state and local law enforcement officials from 397 agencies.

Dr.
Stephen Mackenzie has been training and working police service dogs for over 17 years. He is a part time Deputy with the Schoharie County Sheriff's Office (New York). During his law enforcement career he has served as a K-9 handler for 7 years and K-9 Trainer for 8 years. Stephen Mackenzie is a Trainer/Examiner of police dog teams for the state of New York; an Examiner of police work dog teams for the Connecticut Police Work Dog Association; and a Master Trainer with the North American Police Work Dog Association.

According to the book description of Decoys and Aggression: A Police K-9 Training Manual “A good decoy needs to be an expert in canine communication, and needs to know how to use this language to stimulate aggression in the dog. This book explains, step by step, how to understand the canine paralanguage and how to use your own body to communicate with the dog.”

Steven Drielak is a retired Lieutenant from the Suffolk County District Attorney’s Office. His last assignment was as the commanding officer of the Environmental Crimes Unit. After leaving the Suffolk County District Attorney’s Office, Steven Drielak became the Director, Homeland Security Program, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Steven Drielak is the author of Hot Zone Forensics: Chemical, Biological, and Radiological Evidence Collection and Environmental Crime: Evidence Gathering and Investigative Techniques. He is also the co-author of Weapons of Mass Destruction: Response and Investigation with Thomas Brandon.

According to the book description of Environmental
Crime: Evidence Gathering and Investigative Techniques, “The purpose of this book is to guide the new criminal investigator who is about to enter the highly-regulated and complex field of criminal environmental investigation. This type of criminal investigation has a "steep learning curve." Every hazardous waste evidence-gathering operation is strictly regulated by numerous laws and mandated procedures. This book has been written in a format that will take the new investigator successfully through this learning process.”

Tony Capria began his law enforcement career as a police officer in the Syracuse Police Department (New York). After working in 6 months in patrol, he was assigned as an investigator in the police department's organized crime unit. Tony Capria left law enforcement for a few years to pursue business interests but return in 1976 as a corrections officer at the Jamesville Penitentiary (New York).

Tony Capria moved to the Onondaga County Sheriff’s Office where he took a position as a deputy sheriff in the jail. He was promoted to sergeant and responsible to supervise a shift of a dozen deputies with custody responsibility for over 200 inmates. Tony Capria left the Onondaga County Sheriff’s Department after an on-duty injury. Tony Capria is the author of Betrayal.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 948
police officers (representing 397 police departments) and their 2014 police books in 34 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Technology Institute for Rural Law Enforcement

Registration is open! Apply by August 1, 2008 to attend the next Technology Institute for Law Enforcement.

October 26-30, 2008
Coronado (San Diego), California

This
technology institute, sponsored by the National Institute of Justice and hosted by the Rural Law Enforcement Technology Center, is designed for the command staff of rural and small law enforcement agencies containing less than 50 sworn police officers. Law enforcement personnel will learn about and discuss technology initiatives and issues affecting the rural and small law enforcement community. Participants will receive information and assistance on existing and developing technologies, work through problems relating to technology implementation, and exchange technology lessons learned, that are of importance to the rural and small law enforcement community.

Costs and Attendance
There is no registration cost and all travel, food, and lodging expenses are paid. However, only 35 individuals will be selected to attend.

Note: Previous attendees of the Rural
Law Enforcement Technology Institute or NIJ's Law Enforcement or Corrections Technology Institutes are not eligible to reattend.

Participants will give brief (no more than 15 minutes) presentations on a
technology issue that their departments have encountered or are in the process of implementing (e.g., implementation of a crime mapping program, new communications system, automated booking station). The presentation can be either on an "issue to be dealt with" or a "lessons learned" and must be submitted on CD-ROM with the application.

Registration
The deadline for submitting an application is August 1, 2008.
Download the registration form (pdf, 1 page).

Applications not received by that date or applications submitted without a CD-ROM containing the PowerPoint presentation will not be considered.

Mail completed applications to:
Rural
Law Enforcement Technology Center
ATTN: Rural LE Tech Institute
101 Bulldog Lane
Hazard, KY 41701

Contact Information
Please contact Scott Barker, Deputy Director-Rural
Law Enforcement Technology Center, at 866-787-2553 or by email at ruletc1@aol.com for additional information about the Rural Law Enforcement Technology Institute.