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Monday, February 25, 2008

Austin to New York

February 25, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added one police officer from the Austin Police Department and two from the NYPD.

Jimmie Davenport is a 18 year member of the Austin Police Department (Texas). He has spent 14 years in the K9 Unit. His duties have included setting up advanced training within the his K9 Unit for new and experienced handlers. Officer Jimmie Davenport also has been a SWAT K9 for ten years and has helped design the SWAT K9 program currently in use. Officer Davenport has also written K9 training columns for SWAT magazine, Police K9 Magazine and International Police Working Dog Association. Jimmie Davenport is the author of Run, But You Can't Hide.

According to the description of Run, But You Can't Hide, it “is author
Jimmie Davenport, Jr.'s, wry advice to criminals faced with apprehension by a police K9. In his more than twelve years a K9 handler, including with a SWAT team, Davenport has found his confidence in his dogs more than rewarded, and his engaging account of his experiences with Stuka and Ammo reveal the training, dedication, and determination that goes into forging an effective K9 team. The drama of the stories he relates is complimented by Davenport's genuine affection for his canine partners, and the detailed narrative he has crafted draws readers into this adrenaline-fueled world, leaving us with a new appreciation for the abilities of those animals trained to assist law enforcement.”

Robert McGuire was appointed commissioner of the NYPD in 1978 and served for almost six years; making him one of the longest serving commissioners during the modern era. Robert McGuire is the author of In the Line of Fire: A Commisioner's Views on Cops and Crime.

Craig Meissner is a sergeant with the New York City Police Department. He worked patrol, as a robber investigator, patrol sergeant and training officer. Sergeant Craig Meissner has written extensively about officer safety issues and is the author of Disguised Weapons: The Law Enforcemnt Guide To Covert Guns, Knives, And Other Weapons.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 859
police officers (representing 383 police departments) and their 1805 police books in 32 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Contact Information:
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Sunday, February 24, 2008

Contract Instructors Wanted

International Tactical Officers Training Association (ITOTA)

The ITOTA is an international association designed to offer quality, professional academic and practical training. The ITOTA recognizes the need to expand and share tactical knowledge by focusing on the wealth of information and experience that exists in the global
tactical community. The ITOTA is currently seeking qualified, experienced instructors to instruct tactical courses for military, law enforcement and corrections located at CONUS and OCONUS locations. ITOTA instructors will be assigned to and mentor specific courses during established instruction periods and will be deployed to various training sites globally.

MORE INFORMATION
http://www.criminaljustice-online.com/forum16/1090.html

850 Police Officers

February 23, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. With the addition of three NYPD cops, the website now lists 850 police officers from nearly 400 departments. The NYPD cops total 119 authors.

Retired
New York City Police Department bomb squad detective Kenneth Dudonis co-authored The Counterterrorism Handbook: Tactics, Procedures, and Techniques with Frank Bolz. According to the book description, the “third edition is an invaluable resource for those who recognize that preparation is the best defense in the War on Terror. Revised and expanded to reflect information obtained since the September 11th attacks, this latest edition provides an understanding of the strategies, tactics, and techniques required to counter terrorism as it exists today.”

A 19th Century
New York City Police Department detective, Philip Farley, published Criminals Of America: Or Tales Of The Lives Of Thieves, Enabling Everyone To Be His Own Detective.

Robert Fasone received a degree in Liberal Arts at Kingsborough Community College and graduated cum laude with a degree in English from Brooklyn College in 1987. His first job had little to do with his degree in English. He was hired as a collector and then promoted to a credit analyst at Security Pacific Bank in New York. He worked for a short time at the Belding Hemingway Company as a credit analyst before becoming a New York City Police Officer. Robert worked as a cop in Manhattan South; primarily in the 1st and 9th Precincts. Robert and his family moved to South Florida, where he worked at American Express Travel Related Services for fourteen years, most recently as their Regulatory Compliance Manager in American Express' Ft. Lauderdale offices.

Robert Fasone is the author of two novels: Bread Upon the Water and A Chase After Wind.

According to the description of A Chase After Wind, “Neil “Momma” Mia was a lieutenant in the
NYPD spearheading the narcotics war against Manual Cordova. His uneasy alliance with Don Gino Armenti led him to defy direct orders to save the Don’s son from Cordova. Momma did his job too well, and it all became personal when Cordova ordered the brutal murder of Mia’s wife. Neil threw down his badge and went on a bloody rampage seeking vengeance, leaving a trail of dead bodies in his wake. Cordova sent a terrifying message: Christy Mia was next. Momma had to save his daughter, and with the assistance of Don Armenti, began a life on the run. Five years later Cordova took the one precious thing Neil Mia lived for…or did he…? The only way for Momma to find out was to pursue those responsible, not only to save Christy’s life, but to redeem his own…and discover the truth.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 850
police officers (representing 382 police departments) and their 1792 police books in 32 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Contact Information:
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Saturday, February 23, 2008

Community Criminal Jusice

From Greg Bergman

Last week, Jack Straw, the Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for
Justice of Great Britain, visited the Red Hook Community Justice Center in Brooklyn. After his visit, he wrote an op-ed describing his experience at Red Hook forThe Guardian . Given its eloquence, I thought it was worth sharing an excerpt:

This week, I have been in New York to visit the Red Hook Community
Justice Center. This was the United States' first community court seeking to solve neighbourhood problems like drugs, crime and domestic violence not as separate problems, but as one. The centre has done much to increase people's confidence in criminal justice, from just 12% of residents feeling confident about their court before the centre opened in 2000, to 71% in 2001.

These are impressive statistics, hard to ignore. We're lucky in the United Kingdom that we have so much in our
justice system of which we should be proud... But we should not be so proud that we are unable to learn lessons from others. In New York, they have recognised that the courts cannot do it alone. Without the cooperation of the community, many offenders simply repeat the cycle of offending and detention.

In 2005, we opened our own version of Red Hook, the community
justice centre in north Liverpool. We also set up a community court in Salford. There are now 11 new community justice courts across England and Wales, building on the Liverpool and Salford models.

Community
justice works by making courts more responsive to the priorities of local people. By strengthening the links between the courts and the community, I believe people's confidence in the work of the court will rise and the community will feel more confident about tackling offending behaviour. In community courts, judges come out from behind the bench to attend local events. Offenders are ordered to carry out unpaid work as part of a sentence on projects nominated by residents. In this way, justice really is seen to be done.

The courts aim to break the cycle of reoffending—and doing so is always the top priority of such courts —by tackling some of the underlying causes of
crime such as drug and alcohol addiction, housing, education or debt problems. Sentences aim to include programmes to help solve these problems. Offenders are often young men leading chaotic lives, ill-equipped to deal with the complexities of providing for themselves.

The work of community courts doesn't stop at sentencing. They are able to order people back to court at any time during a community order, to check on their progress but also to support and encourage them when they are doing well. Research with offenders suggests the problem-solving approach improves compliance with their sentence and helps them avoid reoffending in the future.

I want the public to see their courts as an accessible and vital part of their community. Courts that make a visible difference to the day-to-day lives of everyone who lives there, including offenders.

The community courts in England and Wales are part of a growing international movement that seeks to improve both neighborhood safety and public trust in
justice. Recently, we have seen the idea of community justice spread to Canada, New Zealand, South Africa, Ireland, Australia and Scotland. Other countries that have visited our model projects or asked us to help them rethink their approach to neighborhood crime include Armenia, Georgia, China and the United Arab Emirates (to name just a few).

If it continues to flourish, the community justice movement has the potential to achieve broad change in
criminal justice systems across the world—and in the process help improve the lives of millions of disadvantaged people. To find out more about community courts around the world, click here. To request more information about the Center for Court Innovation's technical assistance in this area, please contact langj@courtinnovation.org.

Thanks for your time and interest. If you have any questions, I can be reached at
bermang@courtinnovation.org.

A sponsor of this blog article is
promotional resources material.

Highway Drug Interdiction

February 23, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) The February 20, 2008 program of Conversations with Cops at The Watering Hole explores Highway Drug Interdiction with Sergeant Andrew G. Hawkes of the Collin County Sheriff’s Office (Texas).

Program Date: February 27, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Highway Drug Interdiction
Guests: Sergeant
Andrew Hawkes and Greg Ferency
Listen Live: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

About the Guest
Sergeant
Andrew Hawkes has over 17 years of law enforcement experience. He has a BA in Criminal Justice and is currently completing his master’s degree in Public Administration. Additionally, he is a graduate of the Law Enforcement Management Institute of Texas; has a Master Police Peace Officer Certificate from the State of Texas; and, has a Police Instructor’s Licenses from the State of Texas. Currently, Sergeant Andrew Hawkes is a member of the Collin County Sheriff’s Office (Texas) where he is a senior sergeant in the patrol operations. Sergeant Andrew Hawkes is the author of Secrets of Successful Highway Interdiction. According to Sergeant Andrew Hawkes, “After 17 years of highway drug interdiction, 500 felony arrests, 5,100 pounds in drug seizures, and over $20 million (drugs, cash and vehicles), I have learned a lot of drug-busting techniques that I want to share with you.”

Greg Ferency is a police officer for the Terre Haute Police Department (Indiana). His assignments have included a county-wide Drug Task Force. He has extensive experience in drug related crimes as both an investigator and undercover officer. Greg Ferency has specialized training and experience in methamphetamine related investigations.

He has certifications from the DEA Clandestine Laboratory Enforcement Team in the area of Basic, Site Safety and Tactical Operations.
Greg Ferency has been at the scene of over 550 methamphetamine lab scenes as both lead investigator and site safety officer since 1999. He is a court certified expert in methamphetamine and its associated clandestine labs. Greg Ferency has trained law enforcement, civilian groups, educational system employees, medical staff and correctional personnel in methamphetamine and other drug related topics. Greg Ferency is the author of Narc Ops: A Look Inside Drug Enforcement.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant
Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Highway Drug Interdiction

February 23, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) The February 20, 2008 program of Conversations with Cops at The Watering Hole explores Highway Drug Interdiction with Sergeant Andrew G. Hawkes of the Collin County Sheriff’s Office (Texas).

Program Date: February 27, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Highway Drug Interdiction
Guests: Sergeant
Andrew Hawkes and Greg Ferency
Listen Live: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

About the Guest
Sergeant
Andrew Hawkes has over 17 years of law enforcement experience. He has a BA in Criminal Justice and is currently completing his master’s degree in Public Administration. Additionally, he is a graduate of the Law Enforcement Management Institute of Texas; has a Master Police Peace Officer Certificate from the State of Texas; and, has a Police Instructor’s Licenses from the State of Texas. Currently, Sergeant Andrew Hawkes is a member of the Collin County Sheriff’s Office (Texas) where he is a senior sergeant in the patrol operations. Sergeant Andrew Hawkes is the author of Secrets of Successful Highway Interdiction. According to Sergeant Andrew Hawkes, “After 17 years of highway drug interdiction, 500 felony arrests, 5,100 pounds in drug seizures, and over $20 million (drugs, cash and vehicles), I have learned a lot of drug-busting techniques that I want to share with you.”

Greg Ferency is a police officer for the Terre Haute Police Department (Indiana). His assignments have included a county-wide Drug Task Force. He has extensive experience in drug related crimes as both an investigator and undercover officer. Greg Ferency has specialized training and experience in methamphetamine related investigations.

He has certifications from the DEA Clandestine Laboratory Enforcement Team in the area of Basic, Site Safety and Tactical Operations.
Greg Ferency has been at the scene of over 550 methamphetamine lab scenes as both lead investigator and site safety officer since 1999. He is a court certified expert in methamphetamine and its associated clandestine labs. Greg Ferency has trained law enforcement, civilian groups, educational system employees, medical staff and correctional personnel in methamphetamine and other drug related topics. Greg Ferency is the author of Narc Ops: A Look Inside Drug Enforcement.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant
Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Friday, February 22, 2008

Beslan: Cry of the Bear Cubs

By Greg Ferency

They executed a plan of action, which involved wrangling the adults and students into the school building. They fired their weapons in the air and on the ground in an effort to maximize panic and submission to their demands. It was incredibly effective. Speed was vital to them and they had planned and done their job well. At first some of the victims thought the original shots being fired was a
military drill or police "chasing bandits". One teenage student thought this exact scenario until she saw a "bearded man" yell at her "Why are you standing here? You are all being taken hostage!" A police officer and security guard engaged the attackers with minimal effect. They didn't have much of chance and were quickly cut down. However, it is just possible their actions allowed an amount of potential victims to get away. No matter how small or large that unknown number was it was significant.

READ ON
http://www.police-writers.com/ferency_beslan.html

Leadership

An Except from Leadership: Texas Hold 'em Style

You cannot survive without that intangible quality we call heart. The mark of a top player is not how much he wins when he is winning but how he handles his losses. If you win for thirty days in a row, that makes no difference if on the thirty-first you have a bad night, go crazy, and throw it all away.
Bobby Baldwin on Poker

Morale is incredibly important in any organization; it affects everything. It affects how people treat one another, their work quality and even the way in which they answer the phone. It is elusive in nature but palpable in its impact. If morale is low, it is a problem even if everything else in an organization is strong. Karl Von Clausewitz, a Prussian military general and military theorist, identified morale as a fundamental military principle. Since Clausewitz published On War, morale has developed into a concept seen as critical to organizations. Unfortunately, morale is difficult to define and in many circles has become somewhat synonymous with motivation. But, morale is not about motivation.


READ ON
http://www.pokerleadership.com/excerpt_chapter_25.html

Thursday, February 21, 2008

NYPD Books

February 20, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three NYPD police officers who have written books.

Richard Brittson is a retired Detective with the New York City Police Departments Computer Crime Squad. He has been a panelist at several conferences including Gartner 2004 and RSA 2005. He is a board member of Northeast Chapter of the High Technology Crime Investigation Association, and was a co-recipient of the 2004 HTCIA Case of the Year.

Anthony Reyes is a retired Detective with the New York Police Departments Computer Crime Squad. During his assignment with the Computer Crimes Squad, he investigated computer intrusion, fraud, identity theft, child exploitation, and software piracy. Detective Reyes previously sat as an alternate member of New York Governor George E. Pataki's Cyber-Security Task Force. Mr. Reyes is a member of the New York State Internet Crimes Against Children Taskforce. He is also a member of the National Institute of Justice Electronic Crime Partnership Initiative (ECPI). Additionally, he is a member of the High Technology Crime Investigation Association (HTCIA), and served as the President in 2005 of the Associations Northeast Chapter. Anthony Reyes and Richard Brittson are the co- authors of Cyber Crime Investigations: Bridging the Gaps Between Security Professionals, Law Enforcement, and Prosecutors.

According to the book description of
Cyber Crime Investigations: Bridging the Gaps Between Security Professionals, Law Enforcement, and Prosecutors, “The book begins with the chapter What is Cyber Crime? This introductory chapter describes the most common challenges faced by cyber investigators today. The following chapters discuss the methodologies behind cyber investigations; and frequently encountered pitfalls.”

Lou Savelli, who has spent all of his 23 years in law enforcement in the streets, is one of the most decorated officers in NYPD history and has received over 100 medals for bravery, outstanding police work, life saving rescues, and record setting investigations. He retired in 2004 as the Detective Squad Commander of the NYPD's Terrorism Interdiction Unit, which he co-founded after 9-11-01 as a proactive counter-terrorism investigative unit responsible to aggressively seek out and investigate terrorist cells in New York.

Lou Savelli was chosen as one of the top 10 of NYPD's most effective leaders of all ranks (out of nearly 20,000 qualified supervisors) and the first supervisor featured in NYPD's Leadership Training School newsletter because of his innovation and success in the field of leadership. He created NYPD's first citywide gang unit called CAGE (Citywide Anti Gang Enforcement) which was awarded the National Gang Crime Research Center's award for The Most Effective Gang Unit in the US. Lou Savelli is the author of eight books in the “Pocket Guide Series:” Guide to Basic Crime Scene Investigation; Gangs Across American and the Symbols; Graffiti Pocket Guide; Street Drugs Pocket Guide; Practical Spanish for Law Enforcement; Identity Theft; Cop Jokes; and A Proactive Law Enforcement Guide for the War on Terror.

According to the description of A Proactive
Law Enforcement Guide for the War on Terror, “Topics include: suggestions for enforcement counter-terror tools officers should carry; tips for spotting out-of-the-ordinary people and situations that can indicate trouble; insight into identifying fake documentation; terrorist investigation strategies; domestic terrorist groups; and, exploration of the killer terrorist mind-set. It includes a helpful glossary of terrorism-related terms and phrases.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 844
police officers (representing 382 police departments) and their 1786 police books in 32 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Contact Information:
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

School Safety CD-ROMs Available from NLECTC

Law enforcement agencies and school systems can now obtain three important school safety programs at no cost on one CD-ROM.

A
Critical Incident: What to do in the First 20 Minutes, developed by the North Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, takes users through a scenario involving a shooter in a high school. Viewers see the school's response and how it implements its plan. At the scenario's end, discussion questions allow them to discuss what went right, what went wrong, and how they can use the lessons learned to improve their own critical incident plans.

School
Crime Operations Package (School COP), has been an extremely popular software program that enables school resource officers (SROs), SRO supervisors, school administrators, and security officers to enter a daily log of incidents, display incidents involving a particular student quickly (valuable for meetings with parents or students), and produce graphics showing school "hot spots" or year-to-year trends, which can help solve problems and communicate issues at school meetings. For example, a map can show where bullying incidents have occurred on a school campus. School COP can also provide evidence of activities undertaken or problems solved, which can help persuade a school board to continue funding an SRO program.

School Safety Plan Generator, an NIJ-developed software program, allows
law enforcement personnel to create a document that serves as a foundation for preparing schools for violent critical incidents and as a reference guide for information needs during a critical incident. The software, created as a result of input from the members of NIJ's NLECTC System and the School Safety Technology Working Group, allows users to answer questions about a particular school and use the information to set up a profile that includes demographics, members of the critical incident planning team and their roles and responsibilities, emergency locations, supplies and equipment on hand, and critical lines of communication.

To obtain copies of the School Safety CD-ROM, contact NLECTC-Southeast at 800-292-4385 or contact the Rural
Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center at 866-RURAL LE (866-787-2553). For more information about these projects contact Program Manager Mike O'Shea at the National Institute of Justice, Michael.Oshea@usdoj.gov

Tuesday, February 19, 2008

Combating Illicit Trafficking in Nuclear and Other Radioactive Material

The IAEA released a reference manual that details how to prevent, detect, and respond to an incidence of nuclear terrorism. Combating Illicit Trafficking in Nuclear and Other Radioactive Material serves as a how-to booklet on several topics related to criminal acts involving nuclear and radioactive material. The 150+ page text is intended for a broad audience, including law enforcement agencies, legislators, customs and border patrol personnel, intelligence officials, emergency response teams and users of nuclear technology.

More Information
http://terrorism-online.blogspot.com/2008/02/combating-illicit-trafficking-in.html

Sunday, February 17, 2008

Police Officer Rights

February 17, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) The February 20, 2008 program of Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole focuses on Police Officer Rights with former police officer and attorney Sean Rogers.

Program Date: February 20, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic:
Police Officer Rights
Guests: Sean Rogers, Esq.
Listen Live: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement


About the Guest
Sean Rogers, a Leonardtown, Maryland attorney, is a former
police officer who specializes in arbitration and mediation. He has signficant experience working with the criminal justice field as an arbitrator. Currently, his practice concentrates on third-party neutral law practice in mediation, factfinding, impasse/dispute resolution and arbitration. Additionally, he conducts conflict resolution through mediation, arbitration and alternative dispute resolution. He has published awards in private, federal and public sectors including: airline, railroad, health care; pulp and paper products; manufacturing; packaging and container; communications; and police, fire and corrections industries. Moreover, Sean Rogers provides comprehensive Labor/Management training, consulting and facilitation services including: Alternate Dispute Resolution, Interest Based Bargaining, Team Building, Negotiating and Arbitration Skills.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant
Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement


Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Tuesday, February 12, 2008

Police Tactical Product

February 13, 2008 (Newport Beach, CA) Bust A Cap, Inc. announced a new, one-of-a-kind device that attaches to your existing flashlight or baton that gives police officers, military and security personnel a tactical advantage in breaking glass windows. Bust A Cap is a rapid entry tool that was designed by a 13-year veteran of one of the largest Sheriff’s Departments in the United States. This device is being utilized by law enforcement, fire departments, government agencies, private security and civilians around the world, giving them a tactical and safe entry or exit out of an automobile, house, boat or plane. By replace the existing cap on a flashlight or baton with a new Bust A Cap device, the user is able to easily make entry through glass windows. The device is manufactured in the United States and made from special steel; applies to an existing flashlight or baton in less than a minute; requires no special training; and, will break a glass window with one tap.

Contact Information
Todd Summers, CEO
BUST A CAP, INC.
20292 Birch Street
Newport Beach, CA. 92660
(949) 752 8100
www.bustacap.net

Thursday, February 07, 2008

Public Safety Technology in the News

Company Makes Cheaper Choice to GPS
Salt Lake Tribune, (01/12/08), Tom Harvey

There are times when a person may need to locate something or someone, for example, Alzheimer's patients, stolen vehicles, or interrupted 911 emergency phone calls. A Utah company, S5 Wireless, has built a wireless test network in
Salt Lake City to demonstrate a chip it developed that can track and locate almost anything the chip is placed in. The chip uses existing cell phone networks, which will reduce costs compared to current GPS systems and have a wider range than other wireless systems. Several factors make the chip unique. First is the low cost of $1 to manufacture, second is a battery life of about 2 years, and finally, the chip is traceable indoors and out. Since the tracking system piggybacks on cell phone networks, the chips can be located in about 2 seconds within a proximity of about 45 feet.
www.redding.com/news/2008/jan/12/company-makes-cheaper-choice-to-gps/

O’Malley Wants DNA Database Expanded
Washingtonpost.com, (01/11/08), John Wagner

Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley has presented a plan for the collection of
DNA samples from people arrested for violent crimes and burglaries. The plan would expand the State's current repository, which only includes samples from convicted offenders. The proposal will be considered during the Maryland General Assembly's 90 day legislative session. The program is modeled after a similar law in Virginia and would cost $1.7 million a year.
www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/01/10/AR2008011003461_pf.html

Law Enforcement Puts New Planning Technology to Use
La Crosse Tribune, (01/14/2008), Dan Springer

A new mapping program from Pictometry International Co. could have a positive effect on the public safety community. The software, now in use by La Crosse County (Wisconsin), will provide high-resolution images of any spot in the county. Unlike currently available services, such as GoogleEarth, Pictometry's images appear to be clearer, which provides viewers a much more detailed view of any area of interest. Plus, these images are taken from different angles, which allows users to obtain further detail. The images can also be used to obtain measurement data. The program has many opportunities for use by the La Crosse County Sheriff's Department, including search and rescue, standoff and hostage situations, and accident reconstruction.
www.lacrossetribune.com/articles/2008/01/14/news/01lead.txt

Schools Incorporate Wi-Fi into Disaster-Response Plans
Wi-Fi Planet.com, (01/21/2008), Amy Mayer

Environmental and population concerns, along with transportation infrastructure, have contributed to the Livermore Valley Joint Unified School District's request to become part of emergency planning and disaster response. Behind this proposal is the fact that the California school district is capable of offering
public safety organizations Wi-Fi network capabilities and could maintain this service using generators if the event of a power failure. Also, these services could be extended to citizens should schools have to used as temporary shelter. Those same Wi-Fi capabilities can be used by law enforcement during nonemergency times. Officers can have access to student databases and other information without taking their laptops into the school.
www.wi-fiplanet.com/columns/article.php/3722926

Online Cop Protects Helena Children
Helenair.com, (01/23/08), Angela Brandt

Grant funding from the Montana Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force has allowed a Helena
Police Department detective to assume a role patrolling the Internet for those committing crimes against children. Det. Bryan Fischer is one of five detectives assuming this new role throughout the state of Montana. Since Fischer began in December 2007, seven cases are now under investigation. According to Fischer, some predators are quick to reveal their intentions, whereas others will take their time and foster a relationship before revealing their intent.
www.helenair.com/articles/2008/01/23/local/top/45lo_080123_onlinecop.txt

Wayland Police Get Night Vision
MetroWest Daily News, (01/20/08), Gabriel Leiner

Using funding from the U.S. Department of
Homeland Security's Commercial Equipment Direct Assistance Program (CEDAP), the Wayland (Massachusetts) Police Department will be acquiring the AN/PVS-14 Night Vision kit. The kit includes a monocular scope, a magnifying lens, a camera adapter, a portable mount, and head gear. The technology will be used in response to night burglaries and to monitor specific areas of town that are considered high priority. The equipment also allows the department to combine components in order to capture still photos or movies during surveillance, and then enhance the images for clarity using Video Detective, a piece of equipment purchased last year by the department.
www.metrowestdailynews.com/news/x1839125303

LAPD Finds a Way to Connect
Los Angeles Times, (01/16/08), Richard Winton

In an area that is rich in cultural diversity, with 224 spoken languages, last summer the
Los Angeles Police Department introduced the Phraselator to assist officers in communicating with residents. The device derives its translations from preloaded police commands that were created with the assistance of officers who have some foreign language proficiency. Officers could use this device for natural disasters, crowd control, or medical emergencies. Officers simply speak a key term or phrase into the unit's microphone and select the correct phrase. The unit can broadcast the translated phrase using the patrol unit's speaker system. To ensure the message is intelligible, the speakers on the cruiser are designed to carry the sound about a half mile away without any distortion. The units are also capable of allowing police to ask questions and record responses that can be translated later. Originally the device was deployed for use by U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan and Iraq.
www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-translate16jan16,1,1648880.story?coll=la-headlines-california&ctrack=1&cset=true

Portland, Oregon
Police Improve Incident Tracking and Public Information Sharing Using ArcGIS
Directions Magazine, (01/22/08)

In an effort to assist officers and inform the public, the
Portland Police Department extended its crime mapping services. The department has enhanced records management to include spatial data relating to highway data to improve the tracking of events on major highways. For citizens, the public website has been updated in an effort to communicate crime data to the community. The Portland Police Department's Freeway Mapping Project uses ERSI's ArcGIS 9 software to capture and plot crime data on a city map. This information can then be used to more accurately track data, as well as provide better information to field officers and commanders. This same data is used to update the agency's public website once a month.
www.directionsmag.com/press.releases/index.php?duty=Show&id=20721&trv=1

Delaware: Forensics Facility Helps Police
Daily Times, (01/23/08), Terri Sanginiti

The year-old Delaware State Police
Forensics Firearms Services Unit will help speed up the process of matching rounds to a firearm for crimes committed in Delaware. The new process can potentially make a match in hours, rather than months. Comparison is done between the newly retrieved rounds and those stored in a national database. When a match is made, it is then determined if both rounds came from the same firearm. This process can work to narrow the list of suspects, or it can help to eliminate suspects. The cost associated with getting this new unit up and running was roughly $400,000 for equipment such as an Integrated Ballistic Identification System, dual comparison microscope, and a bullet recovery system. www.delmarvanow.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080123/DW01/80123021/1058/DCP

York Secures $98,000 Grant for Traffic Enforcement
North Country Gazette, (01/24/08)

The Warren County (New York) Sheriff's Department will be receiving a $98,000 grant to allow for the purchase and installation of Traffic and
Criminal Software (TraCS) computers in 21 of the agency's cruisers. This award comes less than a month after the sheriff had been sworn into office, and will cost the taxpayers nothing. The system functions as an automated reporting program for law enforcement, designed to be more accurate and timelier and improve the collection and dissemination of incident data to be analyzed. Additionally, the system can produce electronic citations for patrol officers. Officials feel that TraCS will improve highway safety for both officers and civilians by reducing the amount of time spent issuing tickets or collecting accident report information.
www.northcountrygazette.org/news/2008/01/24/york_secures_grant/

Tuesday, February 05, 2008

Book and Author of the Year Announced

February 4, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. Police-Writers.com announced the 2008 Book of the Year and 2008 Author of the Year.

What Every Chief Executive Should Know: Using Data to Measure Police Performance, (Looseleaf Law Publications, 2007) by Captain
Jon M. Shane (ret.), was selected as the 2008 Police-Writers.com Book of the Year. In December 1985, Jon Shane Joined the Newark Police Department (New Jersey) and was assigned to the South Police District. During his 20 year law enforcement career, he worked a variety of assignments and worked his way through the ranks of detective, sergeant and lieutenant, eventually reaching the rank of Captain.

Jon Shane’s book stood out among the entrants because it significantly advances management decision making in the field of law enforcement. The book provides models and mathematical approaches to management questions like: “How many officers do we need? Are we efficiently using the ones we have? Is there a relationship between the number of officers we have and our crime rate? What is the status of our patrol car fleet? Are citizens satisfied with our work? What is the cost of our special programs and what are the actual benefits?”

One Police-Writers.com judge noted that
Jon Shane’s book “took a daunting subject and broke it down into pieces that anyone could understand and put to use. Not only did he give simple and easy to understand explanations, he also provides examples of types of data and how to work with that data to make intelligent decisions. Plus, he provides a CD with ready-to-use Excel spreadsheets for an executive to use right away.” A second judge noted, “Shane’s book goes beyond the use of math to solve management questions in policing. The hidden value in the work may be that it demonstrates new ways of thinking about crime. Potentially, it could help put the word “analysis” back into “crime analysis.”

James H. Lilley was selected as the 2008 Police-Writers.com Author of the Year. The author of the year selection was based in part on writing ability and in part on career and community service.

James H. Lilley began his lifetime as a United States Marine in 1961. Shortly after his discharge, he joined the Howard County Police Department (Maryland), graduating first in his class. During his career his received numerous honors such as Medal of Valor, four Bronze Stars, four Unit Citations and the Governor’s Citation. James H. Lilley has published six novels, articles in Police Chief Magazine and authored an International Association of Chiefs of Police training key. Moreover, he began studying Martial Arts in the early 1960s and is a 8th Degree Black Belt in Shorin Ryu Karate; the first American to achieve this recognition and honor from Sensei Takeshi Miyagi.

James Lilley submitted as an example of his work The Eyes of the Hunter (PublishAmerica 1997). One of the Police-Writers.com judges said of James’ writing, “He is a mature writer with strong plot, character and story development.” Another judge said, “easy to read, and it was very good escapism. The writer has some absolutely beautiful passages wherein he describes a sound or a vista. The sex scenes are pretty hot, too.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 839
police officers (representing 382 police departments) and their 1772 law enforcement books in 32 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Contact Information:
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Sunday, February 03, 2008

Cubbler, Sovino and Acklin

February 3, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three authors: Mathew Cubbler; John Savino; and, Bobby Acklin.

Matthew Cubbler joined the Collegeville Police Department (Pennsylvania) in June 2006. His law enforcement career began in 1994 when he joined the Royersford Borough Police Department. In 1996, he moved to the West Pottsgrove Township Police Department, and then in 2002, after the terrorist attacks of 9/11 he became a Federal Air Marshal. As a member of the Collegeville Police Department, Matthew Cubbler was one of the original members of the regional Chester-Montgomery Emergency Response Team. He has served as the Team's training and firearms instructor as well as an assistant team leader. Additionally, he is a United States Army Gulf War Veteran; having served as an intelligence analyst from 1989 to 1993. Matthew Cubbler is the author of A Brother's Love: A Memoir.

According to the description of A Brother's Love: A Memoir, “One’s role models in life are often found in the unexpected. The person who is our confidant and hero, or role model, may well be a teacher, parent, sibling, or friend who is appreciated too late. For me, my role model was my brother, Andy, who died too soon, at the age of twenty-one. Andy’s story and my own as it unfolds will tell the tale of two brothers who were each others’ best friend. We had a childhood filled with love, joy, laughter, and sadness. Unfortunately for me, I was so busy being my “brother’s keeper” that I never realized the phenomenal human being my brother, had become.

John Savino has been a member of the New York City Police Department since 1982. His career has spanned all aspects of law enforcement, beginning with a short assignment as a uniformed police officer and quick advancement to the Narcotics Division. His investigative skills began developing while assigned to the Manhattan North Narcotics Division. This assignment also helped develop his ability to talk with people from all walks of life, as he worked in an “undercover” capacity buying narcotics in Manhattan.

For the last 15 years he has been assigned to the Manhattan Special Victims Squad, where he investigates reports of Child Abuse and any Sexual Assault occurring in the Borough of Manhattan. While assigned to the Special Victims Squad, he has risen to the prestigious rank of 1st Grade Detective. Detective
John Savino has been involved in thousands of investigations of rape and sexual assault, and has been the lead investigator in many successful serial rape and pattern investigations. John O. Savino is the co-author of the Rape Investigations Handbook.

According to the description of the
Rape Investigation Handbook, This work addresses specific investigative and forensic processes related to sex crimes for those who work in law enforcement, the defense community, or in the private sector. It is an unprecedented collaborative work -- the first working manual for sex crime investigators, written by sex crime investigators and forensic scientists. The key feature of this work is a thorough overview of the investigative and forensic processes related to sex crime investigation. It takes the reader through investigative and forensic processes in a logical sequence, showing how investigations of rape and sexual assault can and should be conducted from start to finish.”

A nine year veteran of the
Kansas City Kansas Police Department, Former Police Officer Bobby Acklin II authored Ass Backwards: A Black Police Officers Hatred for Inner City Criminals and Their Enablers under the pseudonym “Kodiack.” According to Kodiak’s bio, he earned “multiple honors of valor for saving the lives of others in need. Kodiack was very outspoken against African Americans who perpetuate inner-city racial stereo types, and turned his 9 years with the police force into a critical analysis of police ethics and inner city crime. Prior service in the military, and graduation from college shaped Kodiack's world into a logical, serious, but humorous event, thus publishing an auto-biography titled Ass Backwards.”

According to the book description of Ass Backwards: A Black Police Officers Hatred for Inner City Criminals and Their Enablers, “Much like a hibernating bear, author "Kodiack" awakens after thirty-five years to accept his role as the underdog and heed his calling to condemn irresponsible black leaders who encourage the slave mentality in black communities.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 839
police officers (representing 382 police departments) and their 1772 law enforcement books in 32 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Friday, February 01, 2008

Face of Defense: Deputy Follows in Coworkers' Footsteps

By Lance Cpl. Evelio Ramos, USMC
Special to American Forces Press Service

Jan. 31, 2008 - Joining the
Marine Corps family has been a tradition for countless generations of Marines. Some join because a father, grandfather or another family member was a Marine. But new Marine Pfc. Brett Lockhart decided to join after some of his coworkers motivated him to become part of another family. Lockhart was a deputy sheriff at the Brevard County Sheriff's Office, in Titusville, Fla., where out of nearly 1,000 police officers, 15 of them are former Marines. After working as a deputy sheriff for two years, he decided to give the Marine Corps a chance.

"I wanted to be able to fight both battles," Lockhart said. "I've already fought the local battle, but after 9-11, if anything else happens, I want to be there."

Before enlisting, Lockhart talked to the deputies he worked with so he could get an idea of what the
Marine Corps is about.

"I got a lot of advice from them," Lockhart said. "They told me what to expect from training, and I know that gave me an advantage."

Lockhart enlisted in the
Marine Corps in July as an amphibious assault crewman. During his graduation from recruit training, Lockhart received a special visit from eight of his former coworkers, welcoming him to the brotherhood.

"We are very happy to see Brett graduate," said Sgt. Frank T. Hickman, a
deputy sheriff with the department. "Being a Marine is something that's always inside of you. It's good to see him join the family."

Lockhart said he had an idea that the deputies would come, but that after he saw their faces during family day, he could not describe the feeling.

"It was extremely encouraging to see them there," Lockhart said. "It really shows that the
Marine Corps is truly a brotherhood."

"We are all very proud of Brett down at the station," Hickman said. "We want him to know he'll have a job waiting for him whenever he gets back."

(
Marine Lance Cpl. Evelio Ramos serves at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C.)