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Sunday, December 30, 2007

American Heroes Press

December 30, 2007 (San Dimas, CA) American Heroes Press was been established to assist law enforcement, fire, emergency service and military personnel in marketing and promoting their work.

In 2006,
www.police-writers.com a website that lists state and local police officers who have authored books was developed. During 2007, www.military-writers.com a website that lists current, former and retired military personnel who have authored books was developed. In late 2007, www.firefighter-writers.com a website that lists fire and emergency services personnel who have authored books was launched.

Hi Tech
Criminal Justice, the organization that developed and maintains all three websites announced the formation of American Heroes Press, an umbrella imprint for law enforcement, fire, emergency services and military personnel who have or anticipate publishing books.

American Heroes Press will assist new authors in navigating the world of publishing and assist new authors in marketing and promoting their work. Moreover, through the their information distribution network and “on ground” events, American Heroes Press will assist established authors in marketing and promoting their work.

Currently,
www.police-writers.com, the more established of the three websites lists over 800 state and local law enforcement officials who have published. www.military-writers.com lists nearly 100 servicemembers and www.firefighter-writers.com, the newest addition, contains a single listing.

For more information about
American Heroes Press visit the website at www.americanheroespress.com or send an email to editor@police-writers.com.

814 Cops in 2007

December 30, 2007, 2007 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. With the addition of three California police officers the website ended the year with 814 listings of police officers who have written books.

Robert Cole is a retired sergeant from the East Palo Alto Police Department (California) and the author of Under the Gun in Iraq.”

According to the book description of Under the Gun in Iraq, “
Robert Cole - a retired California police officer hired by DynCorp as an international police trainer - presents a vivid account of the challenges of training the Iraqis to handle their own security. In blunt, everyday language, Robert Cole gives the reader an unusually candid and often hair-raising glimpse into reality at the street level as he and his colleagues navigate the dangerous sectors of Baghdad, Tikrit, and Kirkuk, dodging explosions and bullets aimed at them by young, Iraqi, wannabe heroes.”

Retired Chief
Elvin G. Miali started his Law Enforcement career in 1967, with the City of San Gabriel in Los Angeles County. He began as a Patrolman, then he promoted to Detective, Detective Sergeant, Lieutenant Watch Commander, Lieutenant in charge of the Detective Bureau and finally Captain. In 1986 he was appointed Chief of Police of the
Fountain Valley Police Department (California). He was Police Chief for 17 years, prior to his retirement in 2003.

Chief
Elvin G. Miali participated in many Oral Boards and Assessment Centers and observed how difficult it was for many officers to do well in the promotional process. For this reason he wrote the book entitled Unless You're The Lead Dog, The Scenery Never Changes. According to the book description, “He has developed various testing programs and will share with you the inside scoop into the testing process which is not available to everyone. He has assisted many of his officers with one-on-one consultations regarding the testing process. This type of information is coming from the "top" and
Chief Miali knows what the administrators of police agencies want from their candidates, because he was there and made those decisions.”

Joseph C. DeLadurantey was appointed Chief of Police for the City of Irwindale on August 1, 2001 and served until his retirement in 2005. He had served as the interim Chief for one month. Prior to his appointment he was the Law Enforcement Liaison for the District Attorney of Los Angeles County for four years. With over 40 years in law enforcement, he has served as the Chief of Police for the City of Torrance for 5 1/2 years and spent 27 years with the Los Angeles Police Department where he attained the rank of Captain. He retired from law enforcement at the end of 2005 and is currently a management consultant to the public sector.

He is an Associate Professor of Public Administration in the graduate school of Public Administration at Cal State Northridge, has published textbooks and articles for professional journals and lectures throughout the country on various topics. He is currently completing his dissertation and will be receiving a doctoral degree in Public Administration from the University of La Verne in 2007. He is the author of Homicide Investigations Standards Textbook and co-author of Criminal Investigation Standards.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 814
police officers (representing 367 police departments) and their 1726 law enforcement books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Thursday, December 27, 2007

NIJ Project Provides Local Law Enforcement Air Support

Through a grant from the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the Rural Law Enforcement Technology Center (RULETC) is making available a Sky Arrow 600 Sport airplane at no cost to the Mason County and Fleming County (Kentucky) sheriff's departments. These departments will evaluate their use of the light-sport aircraft for six months and at the end of this period RULETC will examine how often and for what purposes the airplane was used. If successful, the evaluation period can be extended an additional six months. The aircraft has already been used to search for stolen vehicles and for a marijuana crop. For more information on the project contact RULETC at ruletc@aol.com or 866-787-2553, or contact the Border Research and Technology Center (Austin, Texas) at brtc@txsheriffs.org or 512-445-2316.

Monday, December 24, 2007

Conversations with Cops

This week’s topic: Law Enforcement Driving Technology; Crime Scenes
Bruce Mather, Chief
Technology Officer Lap Belt Cinch, Inc. will be discussing high speed driving technology during the first 15 minutes of the show. Kathie Jo Kadziauskas, AAA Crime Scene LLC, will be discussing the aftermath of crime scenes - everything from decomps to hoarding.

The Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting. During the first half-hour of the show, the host, a nationally recognized expert on law enforcement, interviews a subject matter expert on the topic. During the second half-hour the program is joined by two other cops who give a street-level perspective to the conversation.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

Sunday, December 23, 2007

Over 1700 Cop Books

December 23, 2007, 2007 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists over 800 state and local police officers who have written books. With the addition of three police officers and their book, the website has grown to include more than 1700 books written by state and local law enforcement officials.

Vonn Auld Kopp is the pseudonym for a police officer whose 32 year law enforcement career included spending the last 23 years in the Houston Police Department homicide division. Vonn Auld Kopp is the author of Homicidal Humor.

According to the book description of Homicidal Humor, “Welcome to the world of urban police legend and lore. If I had firsthand knowledge of the events described herein, I would be hauled before both federal and state investigative grand juries. What I have actually done here is record stories told to me by cops from all over this country. For three decades I have collected confessions, bizarre stories, statements and lies that were told to me.”

At the age of 19,
Jim Stewart joined the United States Army. He served in Vietnam from October of 1966 to October of 1968. He then worked as a civilian in Vietnam for the next two years. He served with the 552nd, 300th, 560th, 527th , and"C"CO of the 716th MP BN. In 1992, Jim Stewart joined the Brawley Police Department. He retired in 2002 at the rank of corporal. He is the author of The Angel from Vietnam.

According to the book description of “The Angel from Vietnam, “In 1970, after four years in Vietnam,
Jim Stewart left behind his daughter, Phuong. It is estimated that fifty thousand Amerasians were left behind when America pulled out of the country for good in 1973. Jim carried this with him for years after the war. Join him on his journey through personal tragedy as a young boy in Maryland, his often humorous adventures in the Army, and the serious events that took place during his years in Vietnam and afterwards.”

In December 1985,
Jon M. Shane Joined the Newark Police Department (New Jersey) and was assigned to the South Police District. During his 20 year law enforcement career, he worked a variety of assignments and worked his way through the ranks of detective, sergeant and lieutenant, eventually reaching the rank of Captain. His last active duty assignment was in the Command Operations Center which provides command rank supervision to the Department during non-business hours. Captain Jon Shane (ret.) has a BA and Masters in criminal justice; and, is currently working on his Doctorate in Criminal Justice. Captain Jon Shane (ret.) is the author of What Every Chief Executive Should Know.

According to the book description of What Every Chief Executive Should Know, “How many officers do we need? Are we efficiently using the ones we have? Is there a relationship between the number of officers we have and our crime rate? What s the status of our patrol car fleet? Are citizens satisfied with our work? What s the cost of our special programs and what are the actual benefits? Big questions that demand solid answers! This book will help you provide them! Easy to understand and designed to help top administrators use actual current information and calculations to make the kinds of informed decisions that make agencies run smoothly, efficiently and economically.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 811
police officers (representing 366 police departments) and their 1722 law enforcement books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Friday, December 21, 2007

NIJ Funding Opportunities

The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) has recently issued the following solicitations. Please be aware that you must submit your application electronically using Grants.gov. Instructions for the Grants.gov registration process are available at: www.grants.gov/applicants/get_registered.jsp.

Social Science Research in Forensic Science (Posted 12/19/07)Due Date: February 20, 2008, 11:59 p.m. eastern time.Full text of the Solicitation pdf format

Solving Cold Cases With DNA (Posted 12/18/07)Due Date: February 1, 2008, 11:59 p.m. eastern time.Full text of the Solicitation pdf format

Research on Policing (Posted 12/14/07)Due Date: February 12, 2008, 11:59 p.m. eastern time.Full text of the Solicitation pdf format

Research on Terrorism (Posted 12/7/07)Due Date: February 5, 2008, 11:59 p.m. eastern time.Full text of the Solicitation pdf format

Crime and Justice Research (Posted 12/6/07)Due Date: March 5, 2008, 11:59 p.m. eastern time.Full text of the Solicitation pdf format

I Am a Cop

I stand for justice, law and order.
There are many like me within our border.
We are typically seen in uniform carrying a gun
Trying to fix things which cant be undone.

READ ON
http://www.police-writers.com/fletcher_cop.html

Tuesday, December 18, 2007

Conversations with Cops

Date: 12/19/07
Time: 2100 hours Pacific
Topic:
Leadership in Law Enforcement
Guest: Captain Andrew Harvey, (ret.) Ed.D.

The Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting. During the first half-hour of the show, the host, a nationally recognized expert on law enforcement, interviews a subject matter expert on the topic. During the second half-hour the program is joined by two other cops who give a street-level perspective to the conversation.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

The show is immediately available in the archive and shortly thereafter available as an ITunes Download.

Saturday, December 15, 2007

Report on the Results of the CDCR Two-Piece GPS System Field

In August of 2007, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR), Division of Adult Parole Operations (DAPO) initiated a 60 day field test of two-piece Global Positioning System (GPS) units for parolee monitoring. The field test was designed to answer the question: How does a two-piece GPS system perform relative to a one-piece GPS system? The Center for Evidence-Based Corrections was asked by DAPO to report on the results of the field test.

The Center analyzed data provided by the GPS vendors and DAPO on GPS alert activity, unit replacement, and workload impact. The Center also gathered qualitative information on two-piece GPS performance through interviews with parole agents and DAPO staff involved with the field test, as well as focus groups of parolees. The degree to which results of the field test can be generalized is limited by the small number of GPS units included in the field test and the fact that the performance of two-piece GPS units deployed solely for the field test period was compared to the performance of one-piece units that DAPO had been using in the field for two years prior to the field test.

READ ON
http://ucicorrections.seweb.uci.edu/files/Report%20on%20the%20Results%20of%20the%20CDCR%20Two-Piece%20GPS%20System%20Field%20Test.pdf

Friday, December 14, 2007

Crime and Justice Research Solicitation

Funding amounts for this year's NIJ Crime and Justice Research solicitation have doubled—up to $4 million may be available. We also extended the time for applicants to write proposals—90 days.

According to the NIJ, “We're looking for innovative, precedent-setting ideas in what we call our "open" solicitation for social and behavioral research and evaluation on
criminal justice and juvenile justice policy and practice.

As always, the questions your research answers should have clear implications for
criminal justice policy and practice. Other NIJ solicitations and awards can help you focus on targeted topics of interest.”

Proposals are due: March 5, 2008

NIJ's open solicitations:

Terrorism (due: February 5, 2008)
Abuse, neglect, and exploitation of elders (due: February 5, 2008)
Topics of upcoming targeted solicitations:

Human trafficking
Crime prevention and control with a focus on gangs
American Indian Alaska Native
Crime and Justice Research
Safe Community Release for Pretrial and Jail Populations
Social Science Research in
Forensic Science
Criminal Justice Technology Evaluation
Justice System Responses to Violence Against Women
Research on Policing

More Information

http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/sl000820.pdf

Saturday, December 08, 2007

The Watering Hole

The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; Sometimes serious; but, always poignant. During the first half-hour of the show, the host, a nationally recognized expert on law enforcement, interviews a subject matter expert on the topic. During the second half-hour the program is joined by two other cops who give a street-level perspective to the conversation.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

365 Police Departments

December 7, 2007, 2007 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists over 800 state and local police officers who have written books. With the addition of Robert Ernst, Bryan Heger and Paul Anthony, the website now lists state and local police officers from 365 agencies.

Robert R. Ernst, a former deputy sheriff with the Saginaw County Sheriff’s Office (Michigan). He is the author of Deadly Affrays. According to the book description, “The United States Marshals became the first federal law enforcement organization when President George Washington signed into law the Judiciary Act on September 24, 1789. The U.S. Marshals have lost more personnel to violence than any other federal law enforcement agency. Robert Forsyth, one of the original thirteen appointees, was the first Marshal killed in the line of duty when he was shot to death while attempting to serve civil papers on a Baptist minister in Georgia. Since Forsyth’s death, at least 287 additional officers have met violent deaths in almost every imaginable way. These are the stories of those men who were serving their country enforcing the law-- until they became involved in Deadly Affrays.”

Bryan Heger was born in Baltimore, Maryland. He was raised on a small, family owned farm south of Baltimore City called Hanover. After graduating from Arundel Senior High School, he went to work for the Anne Arundel County Police Department where, after twenty-six years, the last thirteen as a sergeant, he received a medical retirement. He and his boys now live in Pasadena, Maryland. Both of the boys attend local schools, and the author works as a full-time dad. He is the author of Me and the Boys: A Man's Guide to Single Parenthood.

According to the description of Me and the Boys: A Man's Guide to Single Parenthood, “Imagine yourself a twenty-six veteran police officer with a file full of commendations. Fully half your career was as a sergeant responsible for a number of young officers under your command. You put in your time on the street. You paid your dues. You’re still young and good at your job, a nice home, two great young boys and a wife...and then”

Paul L. Anthony, EMS (Equity Marketing Specialist) is a well established entrepreneur in Pueblo, Colorado. He is the owner/operator of Anthony Enterprises. With the mettle to be a U.S. Marine, Paul Anthony learned the doctrines of Semper Fidelis; do or die; don't ever give up; etc. As he traveled in Far Eastern countries in the Marine Corps, Paul Anthony studied their philosophies and acquired master level skills in Judo, Karate, and Aikido; which he subsequently taught for 14 years.

Upon returning to Southern California,
Paul Anthony became a police officer with the Anaheim Police Department and in 1964 was selected the Officer of the Year of the Anaheim Police Department. During his law enforcement career, Paul Anthony has served as Police Science Director at Mira Costa College for 9 years and as a training consultant for the International Association of Chiefs of Police for 5 years. As a law enforcement trainer, Paul Anthony trained over 2,000 Vietnam War Veterans who are now highly qualified police officers across the country.

Along the way,
Paul Anthony attended four community colleges and seven universities in four states. He has earned teaching credentials in martial arts, criminology, vocational education, and real estate. Paul Anthony has Community College Administrator credential from the state of California. Anthony is the author of Secret of Success.

According to the editor of Secret of Success, TJ Ramos, “Enjoy entertaining insights that encourage the reader toward success by thinking differently from what's expected. Not just another 'motivational' blurb, not another 'how to get rich quick' guide... this lively trip into basic human nature shows how to understand what people mean, despite what they say!”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 808
police officers (representing 365 police departments) and their 1719 law enforcement books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Sunday, December 02, 2007

What About Me: Coping with the Abduction of a Brother or Sister

Each year, there are more than 58,000 non-family abductions and more than 1 million children are reported missing. This is a staggering number, but it doesn't include the other young victims-the sisters and brothers of those who have been abducted. These overlooked children suffer the loss of their sibling. Their lives are turned asunder, and family patterns are irrevocably changed.

This publication is the effort of those who have lived the nightmare of losing a sister or brother. Eight siblings joined with the Office of
Justice Programs to write this guide. During its creation, these siblings spoke eloquently and from their hearts about the need for a resource for left-behind children whose needs are often overlooked. At the time of the abduction, these siblings said they felt isolated and overwhelmed by their emotions. They rarely found the support they needed to deal with the gaping loss they faced.

DOWNLOAD THE GUIDE
http://ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/publications/what_about_me.html

The Moller Skycar: Patrol Unit of the Future

Like so many other stories, this one begins with the distinct trilling of the 911 line. Frantic voices on the other end, a yell, a crash, bang; shots fired! More calls from neighboring businesses, there are men inside the bank, men with guns. This has happened before; the robbers are experienced, and smart. Never inside for more than 3 minutes, they are gone and blending into the population before the first unit arrives on scene.

The suspects always hit jurisdictions without their own helicopters, and they always hit the furthest bank from the station, during rush hour. This time, the nearest ground unit is at least 8 minutes away. The nearest helicopter is 15 minutes away. The suspects are going to get away, so they think. The 11 miles by road is less than 6 as the crow flies. But this is no crow, it is the 360 MPH, 4 seat, Moller M400 Skycar, and it is overhead in just over a minute from the time of call. No one is getting away from this machine.

READ ON
http://www.police-technology.net/moller.skycar.html

Investigative Uses of Technology: Devices, Tools and Techniques

This special report is intended to be a resource to any law enforcement personnel (investigators, first responders, detectives, prosecutors, etc.) who may have limited or no experience with technology-related crimes or with the tools and techniques available to investigate those crimes. It is not all inclusive. Rather, it deals with the most common techniques, devices, and tools encountered. Technology is advancing at such a rapid rate that the information in this special report must be examined in the context of current technology and practices adjusted as appropriate.

It is recognized that all investigations are unique and the judgment of investigators should be given deference in the implementation of this special report. Circumstances of individual cases and Federal, State, and local laws/rules may require actions other than those described in this special report.

DOWNLOAD THE REPORT
http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/213030.pdf

Law Enforcement Response to Bio-Hazards

I wrote this short article in hopes of creating the importance of Bio Hazards. Generally the Police officer is the first responder to an emergency, like homicides, robbery or simple DUI offenses. In any scenario, the police officer must be alert to potential hazardous areas or people infected with a potentially infectious disease. These diseases can be Hepatitis B, HIV or TB, they are found in bodily fluids, blood, or on other items present.

Over 300,000 caretakers are infected each year from contact with infectious disease carriers or from improper handling procedures. Needle sticks is a major contributor to accidents and from drug interdictions. Needles should always be capped after use and destroyed properly. All needles should never be used twice. Proper hand wear, heavy duty gloves is a must when handling anything that may be potentially infectious or sharp, and protects against saturation and moisture of any kind.

http://www.police-writers.com/law_enforcement_bio_hazards.html