Amazon

Tuesday, October 30, 2007

Tag me

Greetings:

My new book on leadership is up on Amazon. The book image hasn’t appear yet, but things are moving in the right direction. I would appreciate you visiting Amazon and “tagging” the product. This involves you identifying the product for search engines – words like leadership, leader, leading, business
leadership, etc., would be great tags. When it asks you why you have tagged it, you could say something like you are a “friend, business associate, colleague, etc.” and have seen my resume and know I am capable of writing a great book on leadership. Here’s the link:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1419674382/raymonefoster-20

If you want to review my resume you can go to
www.police-technology.net/raymond.foster.cv.html.

Thanks,

Raymond

Books from California Cops

October 28, 2007 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists nearly 800 state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three police officers from California agencies.

Gary Delfino is a 24 year deputy sheriff with the Sonoma County Sheriff's Department (California) Gary Delfino is the author of Conscience of a Dead Killer. According to the book description, “Heaven waits for believers, and Hell waits for those who are evil. For the evil convicted killer, Billy Boyle is a fate worse than Hell. After his execution he meets his Spirit Guide. He discovers his divine punishment.”

Dale L. June has been a Police Officer, U.S. Secret Service Agent, U.S. Customs Intelligence Specialist, Private Investigator, Executive Protection and Security Specialist, and University Instructor. Dale June began his protective service career as an eighteen-year-old soldier assigned to an elite military police unit. After his military service, Dale June settled in California where he worked as a Shasta County Deputy Sheriff, a Redding and Sacramento Police Department (California) police officer while attending college. Graduating with a BS degree from Sacramento State University in Public Administration, he joined the U.S. Secret Service in the Sacramento field office. His Secret Service duties included a two-year assignment as a protective intelligence agent responsible for investigating threats against those protected by the service, interviewing those responsible for the threats, and determining the degree of potential danger they posed.

Upon leaving the
Secret Service, Dale L. June started his own executive protection company, providing security to European and Middle Eastern royalty, celebrities, including many well-known television and movie personalities, VIPs, corporate executives, and an occasional foreign tourist. Later, he returned to government service as a U.S. Customs Intelligence Research Specialist assigned to working terrorism and organized crime. Dale L. June is the author of two books: Introduction to Executive Protection and Protection, Security, and Safeguards: Practical Approaches and Perspectives. He is also the co-author of Undercover.

According to An Introduction to Executive Protection, it “provides beginners in the occupation of executive protection with the tools they need to know and appreciate the profession; to enable them to realize what is expected when they are placed in positions of confidence and trust; and to understand the implications of being responsible for the safety and lives of others. This guide emphasizes the basic elements of executive protection which are often neglected or overlooked in practical application, even by professional schools of executive protection instruction which sometimes mistakenly assume all enrollees are practiced journeymen. In addition to practical and technical considerations of the profession, "executive protection" means working with people on a personal level.”

Jared Zwickey began his law enforcement career in 1965. In 1977, he was promoted to sergeant, in 1982 to lieutenant, in 1993 to Captain and in 1997 he was promoted to chief of police of the Tracey Police Department (California). Currently, he is the Coordinator of Public Safety Training Programs, Director of the POST Basic Police Academy and the State Fire Marshal Firefighter Academy, San Joaquin County Delta College, Stockton, California. Jared Zwickey is the author of Use of Force for Law Enforcement.

According to the book description of Use of Force for Law Enforcement, it is “an indispensable source for law enforcement officers and their supervisors. Any law enforcement official involved with conducting preliminary investigations and other critical incidents, or accurately recording the facts and circumstances concerning use of force will find this product useful. This handy FlipCode provides the officer with topic-related review questions to aid in the precise and comprehensive documentation of the different circumstances surrounding the use of force. Also includes a supervisor's checklist for "Use of Force," "Critical Incidents," and "Administrative Investigation" along with a glossary of terms related to use of force.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 792 police officers (representing 356 police departments) and their 1699
law enforcement books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Sunday, October 28, 2007

Tactics, Law and Investigations

October 28, 2007 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists nearly 800 state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three police officers who have written about tactics, the law and investigations.

A former lieutenant with the
Santa Ana Police Department (California) and professor emeritus from Santa Ana College, Thomas Adams is the author of five books: Introduction to the Administration of Criminal Justice; Training Officers' Handbook; Harden the Target : A Guide to Defense of Life, Limb, and Loved Ones; Law Enforcement - An Introduction To The Police Role In The Community; and Police Field Operations. He is the co-author of a sixth: Crime Scene Investigation.

According to the book description, Police Field Operations “is written from the perspective of a working
police officer, presenting real-life scenarios an officer is likely to encounter while on-duty. With its focus on community policing, it describes how and why certain procedures are used, and gives informative techniques from leading police academies from around the country. It provides readers with the widest range of up-to-date information: Use-of-force issues; guidelines for shaping and enforcing policy; officer survival and stress Reduction. Police Field Operations helps readers develop the necessary skills of observations, perceptions, interviewing techniques, and crowd and riot control. Great resource material for those involved in police patrol procedures and police and field operations.”

In 1968
Devallis Rutledge joined the Santa Ana Police Department where he served for two years. In 1975, he completed law school and in 1976 joined the Orange County District Attorney’s Office as a prosecutor. Since 2000, Devallis Rutledge has worked as private counsel in a law firm and as Special Counsel to the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office. Devallis Rutledge is the author of eleven books: Criminal Investigations and Evidence; The New Police Report Manual; Courtroom Survival, The Officer's Guide to Better Testimony; The Search and Seizure Handbook; The Officer Survival Manual; Criminal Interrogation, Law and Tactics; California Criminal Procedure; California Criminal Law Concepts; The Search and Seizure Field Guide California Peace Officers Field Source guide; and, PC 832 Concepts.

According to the book description of The New Police Report Manual, “this manual is the undisputed authority on plain-talk report writing techniques. Interesting and easy-to-read, it provides hundreds of examples that show easier and better ways to write without any spelling or grammar lessons. It is valuable as a supplemental reader for investigations or police communications courses.”

By 1960,
Rod Sanford was studying the martial arts. Through his years of study he became a preeminent practitioner and Sensei of traditional martial arts. In 1968, Rod Sanford joined the Santa Cruz Sheriff’s Office. He spent most of his 25 year career with the Santa Cruz Sheriff’s Office as a patrol sergeant. However, he was a member of several specialized units such as the search and rescue team, dive team, mounted unit and the SWAT team. In 1969, he began to teach defensive tactics to his fellow police officers. For the next twenty-five years, Rod Sanford would teach firearms and officer safety tactics as well as defensive tactics.

In 1983, Rod Sanford left the Santa Cruz Sheriff’s Office and founded the Pacific Institute of Defensive Tactics in order to teach
law enforcement tactics full-time. Rod Sanford is the author of Law Enforcement: Reasonable Force Options; Basic Arrest Tactics & Self-Defense for Law Enforcement; and, Arrest Control Techniques & Baton Tactic.

According to the book description of Law Enforcement: Reasonable Force Options, “This book is for all
law enforcement officers, students and instructors. No matter what your background or system you will find, tactics and techniques that will help you enjoy a successful career and keep you going home safely at the end of each shift. Rod Sanford has drawn from over 30 years of law enforcement and training experience to bring you the essence of use of force, defensive tactics and officer training in a complete text with over 1,600 step-by-step photographs.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 789 police officers (representing 353 police departments) and their 1694
law enforcement books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Saturday, October 27, 2007

San Francisco Police Officers

October 26, 2007 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists nearly 800 state and local police officers who have written books. The Website added three San Francisco Police Department police officers.

Sergeant
Peter Thoshinsky graduated from San Jose State University in 1982 with a degree in Criminal Justice. In June of 1982, he joined the San Francisco Police Department. He was promoted to sergeant in 1990. He worked the Poterero, Central, Southern and Ingleside Stations as well as the Narcotics Bureau. A 20 year veteran of law enforcement he also served as a member and supervisor on the San Francisco Police Department’s SWAT team. A photograph for almost 30 years, he is the author of Blue in Black & White, a collection of photographs relating to law enforcement.

Inspector
Mark Hawthorne is a 28 year veteran of the San Francisco Police Department. He has been assigned patrol, field operations and investigations. His current assignment is Crime Scene Investigations. As a POST instructor he specializes in Instructor Development, Preliminary Investigations and Crime Scenes. As a an adjunct faculty member of the City College of San Francisco Administration of Justice and Fire Science Department he acts as an advisor to the Forensic Science Club. Inspector Mark Hawthorne is the author of First Unit Responder: A Guide for Physical Evidence Collection for Patrol Officers and Fingerprints: Analysis and Understanding.

According to the book description of First Unit Responder: A Guide for Physical Evidence Collection for Patrol Officers, “Physical evidence cannot be wrong; it cannot perjure itself; it cannot be wholly absent. Only its interpretation can err. Only human failure to find it, study and understand it, can diminish its value." -Presiding Judge, Harris v U.S., 331 U.S. 145 (1947) HOW TO MAINTAIN THE INTEGRITY OF THE CRIME SCENE WHILE CONDUCTING AN INVESTIGATION. First Unit Responder: A Guide to Physical Evidence Collection for Patrol Officers is a training guide and reference for patrol officers and criminal investigators, who conduct preliminary investigations of
crime scene, to aid in identification, collection, and booking of physical evidence. Written by a veteran of 24 years of law enforcement, the book stresses the importance of understanding the critical nature of physical evidence and preservation of the crime scene as part of the case against a criminal defendant. This book is an important tool for police academies that train recruits and veteran patrol officers, as well as for students of criminal justice who seek guidelines for proper collection and handling of physical evidence”

According to Corporal Andreas K. Mendel, NCO in Charge,
Forensic Identification Section, West Vancouver Police, in Canadian Society of Forensic Science Journal, “Mark Hawthorne's easy writing style and use of personal anecdotes make this book a relaxed read. First Unit Responder is a good resource for recruit training or criminal justice/criminology students, or as review material for seasoned investigators.”

Prentice E. Sanders was the Chief of Police of the San Francisco Police Department for fourteen months in 2002 and 2003. He was born in Texas and moved to San Francisco's Laurel Heights at the age of fourteen. After serving in the Army, he then received Bachelor's and Masters Degrees from Golden Gate University. Prentice Earl Sanders joined the San Francisco Police Department in 1964, becoming the San Francisco Police Department's first African American chief of police. In 2006, Prentice Earl Sanders and co- authored The Zebra Murders: A Season of Killing, Racial Madness, and Civil Rights.

According to Publisher’s Weekly, The Zebra Murders: A Season of Killing, Racial Madness, and Civil Rights is a “look at a largely forgotten reign of terror in San Francisco in 1973 and 1974 is an interesting if superficial true police procedural. Sanders, the SFPD's first African-American chief of
police, was one of the lead detectives on the case code-named the Zebra Murders, involving a group of African-American men who, apparently racially motivated, were targeting whites in vicious random acts of violence that claimed 15 lives. The book reads less like an objective assessment of these events than a memoir of Sanders's experiences with the investigation and his role in a civil lawsuit against the SFPD to combat rampant racial discrimination. Oddly, about halfway in, the authors break the linear narrative with information derived only at the case's end, rather than lay out the police work and discoveries as they happened. The efforts to compare the police tactics with post-9/11 targeting of Muslims will strike most readers as labored despite Sanders's insistence that the killings were acts of political terror, not mere serial killings. Nonetheless, this serves as a useful introduction to the case.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 786 police officers (representing 352 police departments) and their 1674
law enforcement books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Friday, October 26, 2007

Police History and Military Fiction

October 26, 2007 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists nearly 800 state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three authors who have written police history, military fiction and on crime prevention.

Kevin J. Mullen served for more than twenty-six years with the San Francisco Police Department and retired at the rank of deputy chief. He has written extensively in magazines and newspapers on criminal justice issues. He is the author of Let Justice Be Done: Crime and Politics in Early San Francisco, Dangerous Strangers: Minority Newcomers and Criminal Violence in the Urban West, 1850-2000 and The Toughest Gang in Town: Police Stories From Old San Francisco.

According to the book description of Dangerous Strangers: Minority Newcomers and Criminal Violence in the Urban West, 1850-2000, “Have newcomers to American cities been responsible for a disproportionate amount of violent crime? Dangerous Strangers takes up this question by examining the incidence of criminal violence among several waves of immigrant/ethnic groups in San Francisco over 150 years. By looking at a variety of groups--Irish, German, Italian, and Chinese immigrants, primarily--and their different experiences at varying times in the city's history, this study addresses the issue of how much violence can be attributed to new groups' treatment by the host society and how much can be traced to traits found in their community of origin.”

Chief
Steven J. Newton is a 25-year law enforcement veteran and a former Marine/Navy veteran. He served with the 3rd Battalion, 24th Marines, 4th Marine Division. With the Navy, he was with NAVACTS-UK-318 and was called back to active duty for the first Desert Storm. Steven J. Newton began his law enforcement career in 1977 when he joined the Springfield Police Department (Missouri). In 1995, he became the chief of police of the Clever Police Department (Missouri).

Now retired and afflicted with Parkinson’s Disease, he continues to write article for various
law enforcement, military and veteran publications. He is also the author of the Old Sergeant and the Old Sergeant and Friends. Steve Newton continues to serve on the Advisory Board of the National Association of Chiefs of Police and serves as Director of the Law Enforcement Equipment Program. He is the Founder of the Silver Star Families of America and he is a supporter of the Missile Defense Advocacy Alliance.

According to the book Description, “The short stories of The Old Sergeant compile many different aspects of the human character, including inspiration, tragedy, honor and humor. He is fictional, but his life, and the lives of the men he commands, become very real to the reader as the stories come together as one. One life lived and some lives lost. Through the war in Iraq and reflections on past wars won, now a distant memory, the Old Sarge is someone who most everyone can relate to. There is a real-time sense in all of the stories told, to be embraced into the reader’s mind and heart.”

William Langlois is a retired San Francisco Police Department police officer and the co-author of Surviving the Age of Fear/Life-Saving Lessons for Senior Citizens from San Francisco's Heroic Decoy Cop Who Was Mugged 256 Times. According to Booklist, “Langlois had a record of successful performance as a decoy in past stings when he was recruited to play the role of The Old Man on a short-term undercover RAT (robbery abatement) team formed in 1987 (and reestablished in 1988) to cut the rate of violent robberies of the elderly in and around their homes in San Francisco's Tenderloin district.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 783 police officers (representing 352 police departments) and their 1670
law enforcement books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Thursday, October 18, 2007

Defense Department Consolidates, Redefines Abuse Policies

By Fred W. Baker III
American Forces Press Service

Oct. 18, 2007 - The Defense Department has consolidated 14 previous domestic abuse policies into one document that more clearly defines the roles and
training of those who deal with the problem. The new publication, "Domestic Abuse Involving DoD Military and Certain Affiliated Personnel," was introduced by senior officials this month to coincide with the department's observance of National Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

"Providing a safe and wholesome environment for our families is a key quality-of-life objective. Publication of this instruction is a significant milestone for the department of Defense and represents a major step forward in our efforts to prevent domestic abuse," said Leslye A. Arsht, deputy undersecretary of defense for
military community and family policy. "Domestic violence destroys families, scars children and harms military readiness. ... We will continue to work to ensure that every home is a safe home."

The publication more clearly defines roles and
training requirements for those the department calls "key responders," said Mike Hoskins, a special assistant in the Office of the Deputy Undersecretary of Defense for Military Community and Family Policy. Key responders include local commanders, law enforcement officials, legal representatives, health care providers, family advocacy staff and chaplains.

The publication is the result of an effort that started more than six years ago with a congressionally mandated task force formed to help the department stop
domestic violence within its ranks. After three years, the panel made nearly 200 recommendations to the department on how to improve its response to reports of domestic violence.

Most of the recommendations are addressed in the new publication, Hoskins said, and include:

-- The need for a comprehensive, coordinated community response to reports of abuse;

-- The requirement to seek agreements with civilian counterparts to increase information sharing regarding abuse incidents;

--
Training needed for key responders; and

-- The need for the Defense Department to conduct sound
criminal investigations of domestic abuse reported to the system.

Since the task force made its recommendations, there have been several initiatives and additional funding addressing
domestic violence within the department, Hoskins said. Also, initiatives were launched in cooperation with other federal agencies. For example, the Defense and Justice departments teamed to train victim advocates and law enforcement personnel, Hoskins said.

In 1998, the reported rate of spouse abuse in the Defense Department was about 20 per every 1,000 families. In 2006 that dropped by about half, for 313 reports of
domestic violence.

But, Hoskins said, "The true scope of the problem is difficult to understand." He said reporting has historically been inconsistent between agencies investigating incidents. Officials say
domestic violence is one of the most underreported crimes in the country.

"We shouldn't necessarily take comfort in reduced rates of
domestic violence. It is highly likely that is a good-news story, in that prevention, education and awareness efforts are working, but we need to be also cognizant of the possibility that we are making it more difficult for victims to come forward and receive assistance. So we have to interpret with caution those numbers," Hoskins said.

Hoskins said that reported victims of
domestic violence are all ages, sexes and military ranks, but the majority are women. A common misconception, he said, is that abuse can be caused by stress or deployments.

"I think some of the most common misperceptions are that it is caused by stress, anger, alcohol, deployment, and although abusers may certainly experience those, they do not cause domestic abuse. Individuals choose whether or not they are going to be abusive," Hoskins said. "In fact, if everyone in our system who experienced stress, anger, deployment in fact were abusive, we would have numbers that would be so high that we wouldn't know what to do with them."

Hoskins said sometimes victims are afraid to come forward because of the fear of damaging their spouse's
military career. He said a report of abuse doesn't necessarily mean an end to a career or the family, but that the report should be handled as any other reported crime.

"The Defense Department has made it very clear that victims will be treated with dignity and respect and that offenders will be held appropriately accountable," Hoskins said.

"The goals of all the programs in the system haven't changed. Those are to help people live healthy lifestyles and, in those cases where families want to stay together, the focus is on helping them stay together," he said. "What we encourage commanders to do is to respond to reports of domestic abuse as they would the credible reports of any other crime, and to initiate ... a law enforcement investigation to determine if a crime occurred," he said.

Criminal Justice Agencies Expand Search for Missing Persons

The National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, NamUs, is the first national online repository for missing persons records and unidentified decedent cases. It was launched in July 2007 by the Office of Justice Program’s National Institute of Justice.

NamUs is made up of two databases: Records of unidentified decedents (select "Unidentified Decedents”); and, missing persons reports (select “Missing Persons”).

Currently, the unidentified decedents database is searchable and available for medical examiners and coroners to upload their cases. The search capability of the missing persons database is in development; the site currently provides resources on State clearinghouses and other
criminal justice agencies.

In 2009, the two databases will be linked. Families, law enforcement agencies, other
criminal justice entities and the general public will be able to search for matches between missing persons and unidentified decedent records.

Visit the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System

Featured Criminal Justice Resource:
Online Criminal Justice Degrees
Search accredited colleges and universities offering online criminal justice. eLearners.com offers degree programs from accredited schools and request free information packet.

Wednesday, October 17, 2007

San Diego Police Officers

October 17, 2007 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists nearly 800 state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three San Diego police officers.

Jay Farrington has been a police officer since 1995. He is a member of the San Diego Police Department where he has worked in assignments such as patrol, SWAT/Primary Response Team and a Graffiti Strike Force. He is a court recognized expert in gangs and graffiti related crimes. Jay Farrington is the author of the novel Domestic Terrorism.

According to the book description of Domestic
Terrorism, “Somewhere between reality and fiction lies the essence of Jay Farrington's compelling first novel, Domestic Terrorism. A real-life street cop, Farrington expertly tells the tale of Wes MacGregor - a street-wise law enforcement veteran whose prophetic vision of the degeneration of America's teenagers comes hauntingly true. Farrington introduces us to child armies who have turned away from their dysfunctional families, to gain the acceptance of a maniacal father figure, hell-bent on exacting his revenge on society in general, and Wes in particular. Ripped from real life events, Domestic Terrorism is a shockingly smart page-turner you won't soon forget.”

A twenty-five year veteran of law enforcement,
Kevin Means is a Flight Officer with the San Diego Police Department’s Air Support Unit. Kevin Means is also the past president of the Airborne Law Enforcement Association and the author of Tactical Helicopter Missions. According to the Airborne Law Enforcement Association, Kevin Means has published the “how to” book on tactical helicopter operations. The book covers everything from the basic to the complex tasks of law enforcement operations to enhance the safety, effectiveness and efficiency of the airborne operation. Means takes the reader along a very well organized journey from understanding technology to dissecting the various types of missions that airborne law enforcement units are now conducting.

Although the book is not all-inclusive, Means addresses the age-old problem with law enforcement operations in confronting the “we’ve always done it this way” attitude. Realizing that it would be unrealistic to think his book can and will work for all operations, Means gives us something to ponder about all facets of a safe airborne
law enforcement operation.”

Lieutenant
John Morrison served in combat as a Marine sergeant, and retired as a senior lieutenant from the San Diego Police Department, having served there as Director of Training, Commanding Officer of SWAT and division executive officer. He has taught, written and lectured widely on training, tactics and leadership. John Morrison is the co-author of Contact & Cover: Two-Officer Suspect Control.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 777 police officers (representing 350 police departments) and their 1660
law enforcement books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Monday, October 15, 2007

NIJ Funding Opportunities

The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) has recently issued the following solicitations. Please be aware that you must submit your application electronically using Grants.gov. Instructions for the Grants.gov registration process are available at: www.grants.gov/applicants/get_registered.jsp.

NIJ FY08 Communications
Technology Concept Paper Solicitation
Grants.gov Funding Opportunity Number: 2008-NIJ-1701

Deadline: November 14, 2007, 11:59 p.m. eastern time.

NIJ is seeking applications to research, develop, and evaluate emerging communication
technology solutions for criminal justice agencies. Specific areas of interest include:

Cellular detection, location, isolation and defeat.
Locator technologies for personnel and equipment assets.
Software Defined Radio (SDR)
technology.
Cognitive radio technology.
In-building communications coverage technologies and related information.
Alternative, cost-effective technologies for interconnection of repeater sites for voice that also enable wireless data services.
Non terrestrial technologies (satellite and airborne).
Mobile hybrid
technology for wireless broadband data (i.e., multiprotocol and multiband technology that seamlessly finds best route and operational band).

Download entire solicitation:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/sl000804.pdf

NIJ FY08 Forensic
DNA Research and Development Concept Paper Solicitation
Grants.gov Funding Opportunity Number: 2008-NIJ-1700

Deadline: November 14, 2007, 11:59 p.m. eastern time.

NIJ is seeking applications for research and development that can enhance the forensic uses of
DNA technology. This solicitation focuses on technologies that result in faster, more robust, more informative, less costly, or less labor-intensive identification, collection, preservation, and/or analysis of DNA evidence collected from crime scenes. Priority will be given to proposals focusing on the following:

General improvements to the “front end” of the
forensic DNA analysis process.
Physical separation of the components of a mixture.
Body-fluid/cell-type identification and characterization.
Identification and/or characterization of biological marker systems that have the potential to reveal additional or more powerful information about the source of the biological evidence.
Improved tools for examining aged, degraded, limited, damaged, inhibited, or otherwise compromised
DNA evidence.
Species differentiation.
Novel methods for genetic profiling.

Download entire solicitation:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/sl000803.pdf

Sunday, October 14, 2007

Tactics and Collision Investigations

October 13, 2007 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists over 770 state and local police officers who have written books. The website added police officers who have written about police tactics and traffic collision investigations.

Captain
James Stalnaker of the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department has over 39 years of experience in law enforcement. Prior to becoming a law enforcement official, he spent six years in the military. During James Stalnaker’s law enforcement career he has had assignments in corrections, patrol, detectives, internal affairs and SWAT. His law enforcement leadership experience includes working as a sergeant in patrol, the training coordinator for his SWAT team, the executive officer of the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department’s Training Division; commanding officer of the Narcotics/SWAT detail and as an Patrol Station Commander. James Stalnaker is the author of Building Search: Tactics for the Patrol Officer.

Although written primarily for patrol officers, Building Search: Tactics for the Patrol Officer, “presents search concepts and tactics that can also be used effectively by
SWAT teams, narcotics officers, probation and parole officers, and security officers. Building Search: Tactics for the Patrol Officer is packed with advice and practical tactics devised and used by a law enforcement veteran with nearly 40 years of law enforcement experience, from the streets to homicide and SWAT as an operator and supervisor. This book isn't about theory. The author has searched every type of building and has devised a tactical search method that is simple, effective, and emphasizes officer safety first.”

David Casteel, senior collision analyst, provides consultation and expert witness services to governmental and private sector clients in the areas of traffic collision causation, analysis and reconstruction. Before joining the Ayres Group in 1992, David Casteel worked for the San Diego City Attorney’s Office as a litigation investigator and collision analyst for more than six years. He was member of the San Diego Police Department for thirteen years. David Casteel is qualified as an expert in accident reconstruction in superior, municipal, federal court and arbitration. He has completed a variety of accident investigation, collision analysis, biomechanics and other related courses at the University of North Florida, Long Beach State University, University of California, San Diego and holds a B.S. in mathematics (engineering emphasis). He also is lecturer in the field and co-author of Basic Collision Analysis and Scene Documentation and Pedestrian Accident Reconstruction and Litigation.

Jerry Eubanks has been involved in the investigation and reconstruction of traffic collisions for more than twenty-five years. From 1976 to 1978, Jerry Eubanks was a reserve police officer. For seven years, he worked as a regular and traffic police officer for the San Diego Police Department. Jerry Eubanks assisted in the development and instruction of 40-hour basic and 40-hour advanced traffic collision investigation courses. He is an ACTAR Accredited Reconstructionist who also operates a successful business as an expert witness in the field. His client base is both varied and international sides in criminal and civil cases.

Jerry Eubanks has been involved in more than 1172 crash tests, of which more than 388 have involved pedestrian, and over 121 bicycle impacts. He has taught Pedestrian Accident Reconstruction courses at Boise State University, the Canadian Police College, and between 1990–2001 he was an adjunct instructor for the Texas Engineering Extension Service, Texas A&M University system. In 2002, he started to instruct for Collision Safety Institute (CSI) in California. He is the co-author of Pedestrian Accident Reconstruction and Pedestrian Accident Reconstruction and Litigation

Police-Writers.com now hosts 774 police officers (representing 350 police departments) and their 1658
law enforcement books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Friday, October 12, 2007

A Cop’s Life

A man once asked me, besides the tickets and the donuts,
What’s it like being a cop?

READ ON
http://www.police-writers.com/hawkes_cops_life.html

350 Law Enforcement Agencies

Police-Writers.com is a website that lists over 760 state and local police officers who have written books. With the addition of three law enforcement officials, the website now includes listings from 350 law enforcement agencies in the United States.

Lee Barnard was a police officer for over 15 years and during his law enforcement career he was a member of the Simi Valley Police Department (California). During his career, he has worked as a Gang Officer, a Detective, Field Training Officer, and a Weaponless Defense Instructor. Lee Barnard has interviewed in excess of 750 Graffiti Vandals clearing over 6,800 cases of graffiti. This has given him an insight into the Graffiti sub-culture. Lee Barnard’s Understanding and Investigating Graffiti is the “first book to cover the entire process of the legal system involving graffiti starting with the history of graffiti. The book leads you through the reading of graffiti, locating the vandal, the arrest and prosecution of the vandal, and lastly the types of punishment for the vandal. Anyone who is tired of viewing the eyesore known as graffiti will be interested in this book.”

Lieutenant
Eugene “Top” Harris began his law enforcement career in 1987. He is a lieutenant on the Monterey Park Police Department (California). Eugene “Top” Harris is the author of The Zero Stress Zone: "A Layman's Guide to Stress Management"

According to the book description, “This Layman's guide to
stress management offers simple stress reduction and avoidance techniques. We can utilize these techniques in our daily quest for a stress free environment. By introducing zero stress as a mindset and not just a catch phrase, this book will help us get to that place I call the Zero Stress Zone. As you will discover, it is so easy you might ask yourself why you need a book to get there. In the end however, if you ask yourself that question, you will have gained an understanding of how simple stress management can really be.”

Sergeant
Andrew G. Hawkes is a 17 year veteran of law enforcement. He is currently a sergeant with the Rockwall County Sheriff’s Office (Texas). Sergeant Andrew G. Hawkes is the author of Secrets of Successful Highway Interdiction. According to Sergeant Andrew G. Hawkes, “After 17 years of highway drug interdiction, 500 felony arrests, 5,100 pounds in drug seizures, and over $20 million (drugs, cash and vehicles), I have learned a lot of drug-busting techniques that I want to share with you.” His book, Secrets of Successful Highway Interdiction, contains eleven chapters on Highway Drug Interdiction.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 768 police officers (representing 350 police departments) and their 1651
law enforcement books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Tuesday, October 02, 2007

California Law Enforcement Books

October 2, 2007 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists over 760 state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three law enforcement officials from California.

Dr.
Bryan Vila, Ph.D. was a member of the United States Marine Corps from 1964 to 1967. His military service included a tour in Vietnam. In 1969, Bryan Vila joined the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. By the time he left the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department in 1978, he had attained the rank of sergeant. He continued this law enforcement career for “six years as a police chief helping the emerging nations of Micronesia develop innovative law enforcement strategies, and two years in Washington, D.C., as a federal law enforcement officer.” Currently, “Bryan Vila, PhD, is a professor of criminal justice at WSU Spokane. Prior to joining WSU in July of 2005, he directed the Division of Crime Control and Prevention Research at the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Institute of Justice.”

Bryan Vila is the co-author of two books: Capital Punishment in the United States: A Documentary History, and The Role of Police in American Society: A Documentary History. He is also the author of Tired Cops: The Importance of Managing Police Fatigue.

According to a reader of Tired Cops: The Importance of Managing Police Fatigue, “For many reasons discussed in this book, Dr. Vila espouses the theme, "good cops don't let tired cops hit the streets." He presents a well-written and documented book that encourages law enforcement officers at all levels to make proper sleep and rest as important in survival as training with firearms and the safe operation of vehicles. Vila's research and studies show that fatigue from sleep loss, disruption of natural body rhythms (circadian), and other factors, such as diet and overtime, can have serious negative effects.”

Dr.
James E. Guffey, Ph.D., is a retired from the United States Army Reserve at the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. Between 1973 and 1986, Dr. James Guffey was a police officer for the Oakland Police Department. In 2006, Dr. James Guffey joined the faculty of National University as an assistant professor. He is the author of Report Writing Fundamentals for Police and Correctional Officers.

According to the book description, Report Writing Fundamentals for Police & Correctional Officers “reviews the basics of proper grammar, covers the practical aspects of writing good reports, and includes sample forms and scenarios that allow users to apply what they have learned. This “how to” guide offers learners the chance to write four typical police reports and two typical corrections reports.”

Carl Stincelli is a retired Sergeant from the Sacramento County Sheriff's Department. He has over 30 years of law enforcement experience with assignments in Burglary, Child Abuse, Adult Sexual Assault, Special Investigations, and Vice. He has also published two works in the art of interviewing and interrogations. Carl holds a Bachelor of Administration Degree in Criminal Justice from the California State University in Sacramento (CA) and is a member of the adjunct faculty with two Community College Districts. Carl Stincelli is the author of Reading between the lines: The investigator's guide to successful interviews and interrogations.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 765 police officers (representing 347 police departments) and their 1648
law enforcement books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.